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Hopefully I'll be meeting one of the H&H IB text book authors tomorrow.

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by ian60, Apr 17, 2011.

  1. ian60

    ian60 New commenter

    What questions would you ask?
    Obviously I have lots of my own, but I'd like to hear from the rest of you.


    All suggestions welcome (apart from yours Karvol)
     
  2. ian60

    ian60 New commenter

    What questions would you ask?
    Obviously I have lots of my own, but I'd like to hear from the rest of you.


    All suggestions welcome (apart from yours Karvol)
     
  3. I moved away from the H&H books for Higher Level as I really didn't like how they approached the calculus section (although I hear this has improved a lot with the second edition). But fundamentally I don't like the approach where you do all the calculus together etc... I've swapped over the the Cambridge (Quadling) books, which I really like apart from the fact they have no technology references in them...

    We still use the H&H books for SL and Studies though and they seem to be quite well liked...

    Things I'd like to see more of though would be more proper past exam questions...
     
  4. The Pearson one by Wazir and Garry is awesome so I would firstly say well done and then ask if they can do them for A level.
    I dont like Neill and Quadling (apologies to the above)
    I find they have made some subjects far harder than they need to be and the IB book is the A level one in a different cover. They wrote the other a few years back and have just copied it over and added a few topics.
    I like the solution bank idea with a CD with worked answers. The Pledger series are riddled with errors but can provide the kids with a "But how has that equalled 2.861?" answers.
    I think a Laymans algorithm column down the side is also nice so weaker pupils can plug and chug.
    The Oxford Oxbox have a check in feature where preambles are briefly tested which is nice as it then helps kids say "ahh thats why I cant find the nth roots of unity" after realising they have never seen radians before
    A box on each topic with common errors and misconceptions
    A box saying 'this topic is also called'....prime example The "Method of differences" are also called telescoping series but A level/IBAC kids are not often told that which makes it hard for them to research beyond the book or class.
    I also believe a link to an online addendum for pupils questioning solutions.
     
  5. Are they planning for the next syllabi, and what about Further Maths HL?
     

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