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Holocaust

Discussion in 'Religious Education' started by romaynecharles, May 3, 2011.

  1. Am contemplating teaching a new scheme of work on The Holocaust to year 9. I was thinking of relating it to the problem of evil and suffering and wondered if anyone had taught the holocaust before and had any activities that had worked well for them, or any tips on handling this topic.
     
  2. Am contemplating teaching a new scheme of work on The Holocaust to year 9. I was thinking of relating it to the problem of evil and suffering and wondered if anyone had taught the holocaust before and had any activities that had worked well for them, or any tips on handling this topic.
     
  3. pete14

    pete14 New commenter

    I think you appear to have this the wrong way round. I would devise a unit on evil and suffering and teach the Holocaust as part of this rather than having a scheme of work on the Holocaust and relating it to evil and suffering. I would also include some Buddhism focused on the life of the Buddha and 4 Noble Truths and possibly story of Adam and Eve.
    What will you include in your scheme of work that makes it anything other than a historical account of the Holocaust with bits of Judaism and prejudice thrown in?
    I suspect that most RE teachers have taught the Holocaust but not in the way you appear to be contemplating.
     
  4. As a Jewish teacher, I value the work RE teachers do on the Holocaust but always hope that it is combined with other work on Judaism that shows it as a living, contemporary religion. If Holocaust work is done out of context, or within a syllabus with little other Jewish content, it is easy to represent Jews as suffering victims.
     
  5. nigiollabhui

    nigiollabhui New commenter

    I have taught a unit on the problem of suffering and evil this year and have had the Holoaust as part of it. We looked at the argument of 'How can there be an all powerful, all loving, all knowing God when there is so much evil and suffering in the world?'
    I tried not to take the Holocaust from a factual/ history point of view as it has been covered in History lessons. I looked more at personal experiences of the victims of the holocaust and how it may have affected their faith in God. e.g. Did people turn to God even if they didn't have a faith before? Did people turn away from faith? etc.
    I used Identity cards of young people from the Holocaust in the hope that students related to them more easily. I tried to develop students empathy through this unit. We looked at survivors from the holocaust and their view on God and religion after the holocaust.
    Hope this is of some help!
     

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