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Holding on to my own needs

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by chocolover, Mar 13, 2012.

  1. I find myself rushing around all day, barely time for anything.
    I make time for lunch but have no morning play and rush even going to the toilet so I can set up for the next lesson.
    What is the cost of a teacher trying to be the best they can? How can you create more time?
     
  2. I find myself rushing around all day, barely time for anything.
    I make time for lunch but have no morning play and rush even going to the toilet so I can set up for the next lesson.
    What is the cost of a teacher trying to be the best they can? How can you create more time?
     
  3. harsh-but-fair

    harsh-but-fair Star commenter

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  4. I'm in my NQT year and I have striven to be the perfect teacher and the best I can be which of course meant me rushing lunch and having no morning or afternoon breaks. This has lead to a breakdown last week and am now off sick with depression and panic disorder for a month (at the minimum) due to the stress.
    The cost of a teacher trying to be the best they can? At best, it pushes you to become the best you can be and motivates you for the good of your pupils. At worst, it can cost you your well-being and your physical and mental health. I've been in the job 6 months, am only 22 and have learnt this very hard lesson already!
    I would say, be careful, make yourself stop and rest during the day and in the evenings, and learn to say no once in a while! I wish I had!
     
  5. Ruthie66

    Ruthie66 New commenter

    I was on a course and they recommended a book - Eat that Frog by Brian Tracy which is full of time management strategies. It's quite a quick easy read but I found it quite useful and I know that others on my course also found it helpful.
     
  6. I don't know if there is an answer to that one chocolover. Burn out? Physical and emotional pressure? Stress? A breakdown?
    Conversely you might be able to function at an impressive level and it won't have an impact...for a while.
    I know exactly what you mean though...there were days in school when it was difficult to catch my breath, let alone stop for a minute!
    The obvious answer to creating more time in school is to either take work home with you and prepare as much as you can in your own time, or to tell yourself that your cannot be a perfectionist at all times...that 'good enough' sometimes has to do.
     
  7. Ruthie66

    Ruthie66 New commenter

    Oh and by the way - that frog book I mentioned recommends having at least one day a week doing no work related stuff at all - because otherwise you burn out and end up hating your job. It also talks about the biggest waste of time being doing something really well that didn't need doing at all and I fear that in teaching that is what often happens.
     

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