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HOD troubles again

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by WessexBoy2, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. A member of my team is going through competency prodedures. I think he is a good classroom teacher. How best should I support him and where should my loyalties lie?
    He has supported me in the past when i have had difficult colleagues in the dept. to contend with but he is no longer effective as he once was. We have a big English department and the deputy head says he wants him out.
    I think he needs support from the school at a difficult time in his personal life. We are not acrrying him.

     
  2. A member of my team is going through competency prodedures. I think he is a good classroom teacher. How best should I support him and where should my loyalties lie?
    He has supported me in the past when i have had difficult colleagues in the dept. to contend with but he is no longer effective as he once was. We have a big English department and the deputy head says he wants him out.
    I think he needs support from the school at a difficult time in his personal life. We are not acrrying him.

     
  3. Your decisions depend on the work culture you operate in, as well as your own choices.
    Analyse on what basis your deputy 'wants him out'. You are HoD and you believe this is a good classroom teacher - if so, on what basis is this scrutiny going ahead? Is this a recent blip, or a gradual slide.....and have YOU as HoD talked with him about concerns that have been aired to you? And planned with him how to work to improve these areas?
    But I am concerned that the jumping-off point seems to be that a deputy 'wants him out'.
    Many SLT now fancy themselves as Alan Sugar and work to create an atmosphere of fear and toadying. If this is happening, and not being challenged in your school, then you have two choices: accept what SLT wants and see your colleague cornered into leaving or eventually dismissed, or resist what SLT wants and see yourself marked as 'not a team player' (a phrase much loved by bullies at work).
    A subset of accepting that SLT want him out is to do nothing to actively help them, so to speak keeping your colleague's blood off your hands. How would you react to this ethically, on a personal basis, especially as this man has supported you iin the past?
    If (a rarity) your school is managed by emotionally-mature intelligent people who know how to get the best out of others, then you can talk in confidence about your dilemma to your deputy and in particular point out your colleague's current personal issues, his past capacity as a classroom teacher, and the areas of concern that have arisen.
    Then working together and with the colleague a way forward can be hit on - maybe including reduced hours, timetable changes, perhaps even change of role (to TA for example). Can I buy you a large drink if this happens?
    You don't say how your colleague feels about the situation, or if he is working with his union, which he needs to do. You also haven't mentioned your performance management reviews, which should be the source from which concerns are pinpointed and acted on.
     
  4. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Then you need to prove this to anyone involved in he competency procedures. The profession cannot lose truly good teachers from the classroom. Do some observations and book scrutinies and SHOW that he is a good teacher.

    Your loyalties need to be with the children being taught. Are they getting the best education they could? If so then support your colleague in proving he is doing a good job. If they are not then there isn't much you can do.
     

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