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Highly Qualified American Teacher

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by awhite86, May 3, 2012.

  1. I am a highly qualified teacher in the state of Arizona. I am qualified to teach years K-8 in America, and I know that translates a bit differently here. Last year I relocated to England to marry my husband and am looking to start teaching again, specifically I am looking to teach primary school. I'm having a dificult time finding what requirements I need to fill in order to begin teaching in England. I'm sure I will have to at least take some exams in order to obtain a teaching certificate. Could someone please advise me about who I need to contact to begin the process?
    Thanks very much!
     
  2. I am a highly qualified teacher in the state of Arizona. I am qualified to teach years K-8 in America, and I know that translates a bit differently here. Last year I relocated to England to marry my husband and am looking to start teaching again, specifically I am looking to teach primary school. I'm having a dificult time finding what requirements I need to fill in order to begin teaching in England. I'm sure I will have to at least take some exams in order to obtain a teaching certificate. Could someone please advise me about who I need to contact to begin the process?
    Thanks very much!
     
  3. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    This section of TES is essentially concerned with teaching outside the UK. You are more likely to get a useful response if you post on 'Overseas Trained Teachers'. I have lived 'abroad' for over 20 years so I can't help with the regulations governing what we call state schools and you call public schools, except to mention that teachers from many different countries are currently employed in the UK. Your Local Education Authority may be able to help. It is also well worth applying to independent (i.e. private or 'public') schools, as these have more flexibility about employment criteria.
     
  4. You may have better luck on the oversea trained section of the TES forum.
    All the best
     
  5. Arepa

    Arepa New commenter

    You have received valuable advice. You might also consider the various international schools in the UK: e.g. the American Community School and the International School of Aberdeen (there are more). In addition the US Department of Defense runs schools for US military families stationed in the UK. The DOD schools and the international schools would recognize your Arizona teaching certificate. You would not, I believe, need a UK certificate.
     
  6. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    TheoGriff (He posts here as an individual and is also a part-time TES staffer) may be able to advise so I suggest a PM to him. He divides his time between UK and Spain (where he lives a rustic life sans computer) so you may or may not receive an immediate response.
     
  7. 576

    576 Established commenter

    There has been talk on these forums recently that US teachers will now have their teacher qualification acknowledged and be automatically awarded QTS without any other exams etc.
    But not sure if it's come into effect yet.
    TA.ottp@education.gsi.gov.uk
    might be able to help you.
     
  8. The following was taken directly from the UK Department of Education website:


    Overseas Trained Teachers (OTTs) from Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the USA

    From 1 April 2012 qualified teachers from Australia, Canada, New Zealand or the USA can apply to the Teaching Agency for qualified teacher status (QTS) without undertaking further training or assessment in England. OTTs from these countries can obtain further information by contacting the Teacher Enquiries telephone number on this page. A downloadable application form is available from the associated resources section of this page.

    http://www.education.gov.uk/aboutdfe/advice/f0011031/overseas-trained-teachers

    --Good luck!
     
  9. So, does that mean that a Canadian / US / Australian / Kiwi teacher would now, having been success getting a job, go on to the payscale according to the number of teaching years they had completed? I was under the impression that we all started at the bottom previously.
    That's good news for me, as a Canadian trained Brit. I thought I'd never be able to go home. In all honesty, I probably never will, but it's nice to know I can if I want to!.
     
  10. percy topliss

    percy topliss Occasional commenter

    oxymoron?
     
    max5775 likes this.
  11. wrldtrvlr123

    wrldtrvlr123 Occasional commenter

    Dammit! As soon as I saw the thread title, I had a contest going with myself to see how long it would take and who would go there.
    I had the over and under (10 posts) but I thought the culprit would be FP. Oh well, maybe next time.
     
  12. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    Tempting, of course, but in fact American teachers do tend to be more highly qualified than their UK counterparts. And please will nobody bring up the traditional fallacy about American qualifications being inferior to British ones. Yes, Oxford and Cambridge are rather more prestigious institutions than the Ku Klux Klan Kollege of Race Relations in Little Tinhorn, Texas, but Harvard and Yale can certainly give them a run for their money.
     
  13. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    "inferior" is a subjective term.
    They are not the same, however. In the UK specialization takes place in year one, in the US colleges ( although not all ) follow a Liberal Arts program and specialization ( although ongoing ) really only takes place in the final year.
    That said, when one visits the universities and speaks to students who are there, it is certainly no easy ride. I have been to perhaps 30 or so US universities along the East coast and a similar number in the UK. The students are equally as bright and engaging in both places.
    One thing the UK cannot get anywhere near the US universities though, is with facilities. They really are astounding in the US.
     
  14. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    True.
    This needs qualifying. In a UK university as far back as the early sixties the first year of my BA consisted of three subjects of equal weight. In Year Two I took English major with Philosophy minor with Environmental Studies (Rocks) as a 'distant minor'. 'Teach Yourself Geology' was invaluable. But I don't need to look back as far as my own experience. Both my sons followed modular bachelors' courses and the elder one only really specialised when it came to his Heriot Watt MSc in Brewing & Distilling, a course incidentally, which attracted a preponderance of Yanks and Canucks.
     
  15. I'm sure the road to being a teacher is different in each country. It also depends on the state in which you study. I completed four years of university, the last two consisting of only education related courses, including student teaching for three months. I then had to take three grueling exams and pass with a sufficient score before I was able to obtain my teaching licence. Other states don't require as much, especially when you get down into the south where they are a bit behind the times!

    Anyways, thanks for all the advice! I've spoken to the local council and am in the process of seeing if I can get my qualifications transferred. Fingers crossed :)
     
  16. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    We'll try to stay serene and calm
    When Alabama gets the bomb.
    Who's next?

    (for those who remember the great Tom Lehrer)
     
  17. My parents had about 3 Tom Lehrer albums. Great stuff: Vatican Rag, New Math, Poisoning Pigeons in the Park, et al. Speaking of highly rated colleges, Tom was a Harvard man.
     
  18. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Established commenter

    Indeed. And he went back to teaching Math(s) because he'd said all he had to say, satirically speaking.
     
  19. kemevez

    kemevez Occasional commenter

    Maybe they could teach in 1930s style international schools?
    This is the funniest thread since the 1930s.
     
  20. Too many words - two too many.
     

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