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high frequency words/tricky words

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by mancminx, Jul 20, 2011.

  1. Yes. But blending and segmenting does not come naturally to many children. Would you agree that being taught something is not the same as learning it. The relationship of teaching to learning is not simple - if only it was.
     
  2. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    She got credit for trying to read the book ... lots of praise in fact.
    and she got a teacher who taught her how to actually apply the phonics she knew to read words she hadn't been taught and is now a very good reader and doesn't need to guess.

     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Yes I would agree. However in this case she hadn't been taught so hadn't had the opportunity to learn.
     
  4. see above.
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    In the sentence you quoted I said
    so the person may or may not be using the initial letter to make their assumption they may be presuming that the word is one they know because the letter shape at the begiining is the same as in that word or they may just be plucking a word from the air ... really it is just conjecture but the result is the same.
     
  6. Msz, I'd very interested to know what you think the differences are between synthetic phonics and linguistic phonics.
    You mentioned Start-Write in that 2007 post -did you mean Sounds-Write?


     
  7. You said this. Do you want to change your position again to one in which the child does not recognise and make the right sound for 'c'?
     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    thumbie may I suggest you read what I actually wrote
     
  9. I can assure you I am doing my best! Have you read what you wrote?
     
  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    SusanG it isn't what I think the differences are between LP & SP... in the thread (following the Channel 4 programme on reading failure) someone asked about Linguistic Phonics and I explained where I was coming from with regards my methods
    and yes I did mean Sounds Write (I was probably thinking shoes [​IMG] )
     
  11. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    yes every word
     
  12. You also wrote this. Do you want to take it back?
     
  13. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    No I don't
     
  14. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Do you recall the instructions from the "Searchlight" method?
    Look carefully at the pictures
    Have the confidence to make a guess ...
     
  15. I, too, would be extremely interested to pin down this concept of 'guessing'.
    This 'definition' reflects my understanding of 'guess' no, it's not my definition, I found it on the internet)
    a. To predict (a result or an event) without sufficient information.b. To assume, presume, or assert (a fact) without sufficient information.
     
  16. thumbie, why do you think Msz should 'take it back'?

    Please explain because this whole exchange has been baffling me and that is clearly a key point for you.
     
  17. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    SusanG if you are asking would I follow the timetable of waiting until Y2 to begin teaching grapheme correspondence and the methods used in Belfast the answer is no .
    If you are asking if I believe that a child's understanding of spoken language is beneficial to learning to read then the answer is yes and we do lots of "playing" with words in nursery.
     
  18. As children are learners moving from the known to the unknown. Thus "guessing", by this definition, is what they do in the learning process. They guess which version of a phoneme to apply, they guess what word fits through grammatical context, they guess which word fits the meaning. The more information they have, the closer to accuracy their guess is likely to be. Once they have learnt (the word; the maths fact; how to boil a soft-boiled egg) they no longer have to guess, they have the knowledge. But until they have the knowledge they only have the theory (the guess). If they only have phonics to rely on when reading they have less information to help them read (or even decode) than when they have phonics plus information gained in other ways.
    I would agree that children should use all possible information when guessing words. I think the guessing you refer to, when it becomes a bad habit, is guessing based on very little information. This is often done without reference to meaning, grammar or phonics!
     
  19. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Just to save you time thumbie I don't want to take anything back.

    A real Y1 child arrived at a school (her records from her previous school showed she was reading ORT stage 6, knew all 44 phonemes - which she was found not to be secure in - and that she knew the first 100 HFW ) she sat down in the reading corner selected a picture book and was observed reading "I can see the cat"
    The book had more text but she was only reading the speech bubble.
    Now when this was discussed it was thought that she was
    a using initial and final sounds
    b using inital letter
    c using HFW knowledge (inaccurately)
    what everyone agreed on was that she wasn't reading the word that was actually on the page
    She wasn't in my class/school
    I have never met the child
     

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