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hence why????

Discussion in 'English' started by dozymare1957, May 7, 2012.

  1. dozymare1957

    dozymare1957 Occasional commenter

    Apologies to the teacher whom I am quoting but this is a genuine enquiry and I didn't want to put it on the original thread as I didn't want to interrupt the train of thought there. I am not criticising your use of English in any way here as I just think that's rude.
    Is it correct to say, "Hence why I am concerned"?
    My understanding of "hence" is "therefore". Would one say, "Therefore, why I am concerned" or just "Therefore, I am concerned"? Should it be "Hence, I am concerned"?
    I often here the phrase "hence why" and it sounds wrong to me.
     
  2. dozymare1957

    dozymare1957 Occasional commenter

    Apologies to the teacher whom I am quoting but this is a genuine enquiry and I didn't want to put it on the original thread as I didn't want to interrupt the train of thought there. I am not criticising your use of English in any way here as I just think that's rude.
    Is it correct to say, "Hence why I am concerned"?
    My understanding of "hence" is "therefore". Would one say, "Therefore, why I am concerned" or just "Therefore, I am concerned"? Should it be "Hence, I am concerned"?
    I often here the phrase "hence why" and it sounds wrong to me.
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    And this looks a bit wrong to me!
     
  4. No, not criticising, just starting a whole new thread to draw attention to the fact that you think it's wrong!
     
  5. It must be a typographical error...
     
  6. No it isn't. Don't you want to learn from your mistakes?
    Anyway, you appear to have fallen into that old trap headed "Sod's Law" or been hoist by your own petard.
    How to choose between images...
     
  7. dozymare1957

    dozymare1957 Occasional commenter

    Oh, how embarrassing. I'm blushing as I sit here![​IMG]
     
  8. Hence can be used to mean 'for this reason' or 'therefore'. However, hence is often followed by a noun rather than a verb, eg 'hence my concern'. To replace it with therefore would involve rewording the clause, ie 'therefore I am concerned'. I agree I wouldn't use 'hence why'. When communicating in non-standard English, though, variations can be allowed as long as the communication is clear and appropriate. As your question was whether this was standard English, I hope I've been able to answer it clearly enough for you.
     
  9. "So " would have been simpler than the slightly self-regarding "hence"
     
  10. dozymare1957

    dozymare1957 Occasional commenter

    "hence", "myself" and "yourself" (these two both inappropriately used) are real in words ATM, aren't they?
     
  11. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I've never heard 'hence why' and I'm none the poorer for it.


     
  12. dozymare1957

    dozymare1957 Occasional commenter

    In school today, CS with a degree in English who is planning on doing PGCE said it again. She also says "We was ...."
     
  13. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Bob's right. Why not use so?
     
  14. dozymare1957

    dozymare1957 Occasional commenter

    I think people like to use words that they feel will make them sound clever. Sadly, their choice often has the opposite effect.
     

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