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Help....

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by darren50, Jan 28, 2011.

  1. Hi all,
    I am an NQT (ICT teacher) and currently doing day-to-day supply after completing one full term on a short term contract. However, I have been offered a cover supervisor role until July 2011 but not sure how this would look on my CV.
    I am and do want to be an 'ICT teacher' but what would look better or worse on my CV. 6 months of day-to-day general supply or a cover supervisor position?
    I appreciate all of your advice.
    Darren


     
  2. Hi all,
    I am an NQT (ICT teacher) and currently doing day-to-day supply after completing one full term on a short term contract. However, I have been offered a cover supervisor role until July 2011 but not sure how this would look on my CV.
    I am and do want to be an 'ICT teacher' but what would look better or worse on my CV. 6 months of day-to-day general supply or a cover supervisor position?
    I appreciate all of your advice.
    Darren


     
  3. littlemissraw

    littlemissraw Occasional commenter

    Only you can decide really.If you hadn't done any supply I'd say go for it as you wouldn't have kicked off your 16 month supply limit. How busy are you finding supply? I bet a regular wage would be nice though? Would they let you do any ICT as a teacher? (few lessons a week paid as teacher and would keep CV up) x
     
  4. Hi
    So at present you should have one term of induction under your belt. You have, if you are doing daily supply, started the clock ticking on your 16 month supply teaching limit.
    The cover supervisor job will not count for induction, but be careful, I am aware of people who have QTS, take a cover supervisor post which then ends up as a teaching post where they regularly teach the same class, plan, deliver mark, provide comments for reports to parents etc - in other words a teaching job that otherwise would qualify for induction BUT as the contract is as a cover supervisor they are paid less than a qualified teacher and do not get the benefits that a NQT would get PPA, NQT time etc. So please do make sure that when you are working as a cover supervisor it is not to the school's advantage (a cheap teacher) and to your disadvantage - lower pay, no induction time and no allowances.
    James
     
  5. Many thanks for this James.
    In regards to my CV, will it look bad that I am working as a cover supervisor when going for a ICT teacher role? Would they prefer someone who is doing supply over cover supervisor?
    I really don't know what to do, try and get supply day-to-day or to apply to this cover supervisor role?
    I appreciate any advice.
    Darren
     
  6. Darren, I don't really know how to advise you but didn't want to let your post pass without comment. I think schools do understand the current employment situation and also understand that many people need a regular wage coming in and with so many people doing supply sometimes people need to make tough decisions. I come from a cover supervisor background - I was working as a cover supervisor when I started my degree and then changed to primary as a TA before taking the GTP route and it certainly never did me any harm. That said, very different circumstances. I do know qualified teachers who have had to take cover supervisor jobs as there is just no work for them in the area, particularly halfway through a year.
    I would echo what James has said, having been an unqualified supervisor where there was one occassion I was asked to cover for an absent drama teacher and it ran on for almost 6 months and I was planning and marking work. I drew the line at covering for the GCSE group and in the end the unions were involved. The school tried to twist the fact that myself a another CS had offered to take those classes at a meeting to decide what was to be done. We pointed out that the meeting minutes actually stated we would cover the classes until the school could locate a qualified drama teacher as a replacement and as it did mean some continuity for the children concerned. It was also stated on the minutes that schemes of work and lessons plans ad the full support of the department staff were to be provided for us - it was not! The school didn't have a leg to stand on and managed to find a qualified drama teacher that they had been unable to locate previously - bottom line it was all about the bank balance and not what was best for the students, so do be careful.
    The other side is that it may get you a foot in the door of a school which could work to your advantage.
    I don't know how to advise but if I couldn't get teaching work (or can't in September) I may have to consider going back to a TA role as I need a wage coming in - sometimes needs must I am afraid :-(
     

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