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Help with supply teaching in N.E. Lincolnshire

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by ZiggyPig, Apr 13, 2012.

  1. Hi all hope you can help.


    I was a secondary teacher for a few years and had to leave
    my job last year for personal reasons. I have been applying for jobs when they
    come up but think I ought to sign up with some supply agencies in the meantime
    to help tide myself over.


    I have a few questions:


    1: Who are the best agencies to sign up with in the N.E. Lincolnshire
    area?


    2: How does it work exactly, do you get up at a particular
    time and wait for the phone to ring?


    3: Do you get paid traveling expenses?


    4: How much does it pay (take home pay) and do you get paid
    daily or weekly?


    5: What are the main differences from supply teaching and
    permanent teaching? Presumably with supply teaching you just turn up and do the
    cover work that is set for the classes and don’t have to do any of the
    duties/marking/IEPs/etc?


     
  2. I don't know about Lincolnshire so can't help there.
    Secondary supply, especially this term, is virtually dead everywhere so don't expect to get much work of any sort.
    Pay is poor unless you are an NQT. Expect to get about 3100 to £120 a day gross.
    You will be expected to mark all work and do playground duties but not to do planning or IEPs etc.
    Some agencies do offer to pay travel expenses but most don't.
    The main advantage of supply teaching is that you go home at the end of the day with nothing to do in the evening. If you have a bad day or a bad class you don't have to face them again.
    The main disadvantage is that the children tend to take advantage of supply teachers so behaviour management is crucial. And everything is unfamiliar so that can be difficult. You don't know the layout of the schools or the regimes of each and they all vary so much.
    Sometimes you get work booked in advance but often you just wake up and get ready and hope that the phone will ring and then you go.
    Bear in mind that most secondary schools use Cover Supervisors now and Yeat 9 and 11s are coming up to study leave so the need for supply teachers is extremely limited. Many teachers get NO work at all.
     
  3. lrw22

    lrw22 Occasional commenter

    Have PMd you Ziggypig.
     
  4. Thanks for the replies.



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>I have a fairly strong classroom presence and
    have worked with some difficult pupils in the past so the behaviour side of
    things doesn&rsquo;t really worry me too much.



    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">

    </font>How early do you usually get up and what time
    to the agencies tend to ring in the morning?
     
  5. Mrs-Pip

    Mrs-Pip New commenter

    Be ready to go from 7am. In my experience they can ring from 6.45 to 10.30! Ring them up and remind them that you are available. Then you just have to wait.
    Good Luck!
     
  6. pepper5

    pepper5 Star commenter

    Hi ziggy
    I usually get up at about 6:15 a.m. to 6:30 a.m. That is so I can eat breakfast, put my make up on, make my lunch and be ready for the phone to start ringing. I usually do not get dressed, but stay in my dressing gown and then am ready to throw on my clothes and go within 5 minutes if the phone rings. I have found the agencies ring as early as 7:10 a.m. and as late as 9:00 a.m. I could make my lunch the night before, but usually I make it in the morning.
    Sometimes, however, you may get bookings in advance.
    I think it is best the night before to pack my bag with pens, pocket tissues, fun time fillers, a bottle of water, a writing pad and anything else I might need. Also, I tend to decide what I am going to wear the night before so I don't lose time in the morning.
    Be prepared to be adaptable and flexible. If you are doing general day to day supply you may have to cover any subject. You can tell the agency, however, that you would prefer to teach your subject only. Most of the time, work has been set so it is not a problem . I have only had a couple of times where no work has been set and another teacher has helped me out. Find out at the beginning what system the school uses if you need assistance in a class where you can't settle the class. In my experience, schools do not mind helping. They would prefer to be asked for help than see a teacher struggle. You will soon find out what schools you want to return to and those you won't want to go to again.
    Go in positive everyday. Be pleasant to everyone. I think the schools like seeing someone who comes in smiling and friendly. If you do a good job, the schools will ask you back and you will soon build up a set of schools where you like to go to and the supply work may lead to something more permanent. Like the above posters have said, when you go home at night you do not have any further work to do.
    Trust this helps, but you will soon get into a system of doing things once you start. These forums are wonderful for asking other people for advice and learning new things. So keep reading and posting on the forum and let us know how you get on once you get your first booking.
     
  7. useless

    useless New commenter

    I think that a good supply teacher is one who nobody notices - just like a good referee. You go in and do your job causing the minimum of fuss.
     
  8. Thanks for the advice everyone [​IMG]
    I've had some people I know recommend Principal Resourcing, does anyone else use them?
     
  9. Can anyone recommend Principal Resourcing?
     

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