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help with second year teaching practice!

Discussion in 'Primary' started by sarahbella88, Aug 11, 2011.

  1. Hey everyone,
    I'm just about to start my second year of a BA hons in Primary Education. For my first year I had a particulalry tough placement - year 5 group of mixed ethnicity who didn't get on too well together, and a class with a lot of low level disruption. When it came to myself or my partner teaching, the children would not listen or behave, (laying down the law in our first lesson didn't seem to work) and even after trying several different techniques it was to no avail. [​IMG] I don't suppose it helped that in our preliminary visits we were introduced as 'helpers who would be working with us for the next few weeks' - I guess the children may not have then seen us as actual teachers?
    Does anybody have advice as to how I may avoid this scenario in year two? or any great behaviour management strategies that may help with a similar class? Thank you!!! [​IMG]
     
  2. Hey everyone,
    I'm just about to start my second year of a BA hons in Primary Education. For my first year I had a particulalry tough placement - year 5 group of mixed ethnicity who didn't get on too well together, and a class with a lot of low level disruption. When it came to myself or my partner teaching, the children would not listen or behave, (laying down the law in our first lesson didn't seem to work) and even after trying several different techniques it was to no avail. [​IMG] I don't suppose it helped that in our preliminary visits we were introduced as 'helpers who would be working with us for the next few weeks' - I guess the children may not have then seen us as actual teachers?
    Does anybody have advice as to how I may avoid this scenario in year two? or any great behaviour management strategies that may help with a similar class? Thank you!!! [​IMG]
     
  3. Hi,
    I've just graduated from a 3 yr BEd, so although not the voice of experience I do appreciate how tough it can be to start a new placement!
    Obviously without knowing your class/seeing you it is difficult to suggest anything other than the fairly obvious. I would suggest that 'laying down the law' is unlikely to work for you, you aren't their teacher and you will be meeting them when their behaviour patterns have been set earlier in the year, some kids may respond to a new 'law laying' but I doubt it would be many.
    My advice would be to use your first days of observations to watch the class teacher and note what strategies they use and the impact of these. Then you can use his/her strategies to keep standards consistent, which is important. As the placement progresses you can then gently amend things to fit your style or to address situations where the teachers strategies aren't working for you.
    You will find that in your longer placements you will get a much better handle on individualising your behaviour management strategies. More time to get to know the children and build yourself a set of strategies that work for you and for the class. The temptation in shorter/earlier placements is to get everything perfect really quickly - unlikely to work no matter how understandable! You will also be treated more like a teacher when you are teaching higher work load in later placements - another obvious point really, the more you teach the more obvious it is who you are and what you are doing with them.
    There are some good books like the Sue Cowley 'Getting the b*ggers to behave' but I would really suggest observing your next class teacher is just as valuable as each cohort is different and each school has differing strategies etc. Relax, every placemnt is different so don't carry your concerns over too heavily - reflection is good practice and you are obviously reflecting to be posting!
    Good luck!
    xxxx
     
  4. I would agree that you don't seem to have been introduced in the most positive way to the class. As for low-level disruption, I have never worked in a school where this does not happen and you need to develop a range of behaviour management strategies to deal with this.
    Some that I use are as follows (although it is by no means an exhaustive list and you should use what works for you and your class):
    • lay out your expectations
    • make sure you follow school behaviour policy consistently
    • remember to praise - teachers are notorious for finding something wrong rather than right with a class (me included)
    • wait for quiet before speaking (look at watch, use a timer, remind them that they are losing break time, dinner time or whatever you wish to withhold)
    • clap for quiet (to save my voice, I often clap and expect the children to respond so you could make a game of it by introducing different rhythms for them to copy, then you can speak)
    • secret sitter, walker, listener (have some really nice stickers and say that you will be choosing a secret walker to assembly - they won't know who until you get to assembly and it only gets handed out if they have walked nicely - I never say who it was if they didn't manage it)
    • try not to shout (depends on the activity of course - raising your voice over a noisy activity is a bit different from shouting for quiet)
    • praise (in a loud voice) a child whose behaviour is what you want (Susie, you are sitting beautifully)
    There is probably loads of other strategies that I use but can't remember them all. Hope these help.
     
  5. I just wanted to say that I used the 'secret walker/listener/P.E. changer' strategy last year with my particularly difficult class - it's amazing! I had Year 4 and I wasn't sure if they'd be too old for it but it worked like a charm. Their reward if they achieved the nice walking/listening was a star on their star chart. If I ever forgot to say who the secret walker was after assembly, a child would ALWAYS remind me, they were so keen to know if it was them. Like Irulan, I never said who the secret person was if they didn't achieve it.
     
  6. Ooh, love the "secret" idea!

    I think the key is, as someone else suggested, is observing how things go with their normal teacher. Have a chat with him / her about the class and maybe find out if they have any techniques effective for particular children. In your obs days you'lol probably get the behaviour management policy which will give you the guidelines.

    Good luck in your placement - I didn't enjoy my first yr placement and I worried aboutmy 2nd yr one, but it was lovely!
     

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