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Help with rhyming patterns-please advise

Discussion in 'English' started by venicequeen, Mar 19, 2012.

  1. I'm sorry to admit I don't know enough about rhyming patterns in poetry etc, as i've never taught a ballad before but I can grasp the basics. If a ballad has 6 stanzas with a rhyming pattern of abbbcca, would the next stanza be abbbcca or would it move on the the next part of the alphabet for example: ddeeeffd? I'm not sure and I have googled to no avail!

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. I'm sorry to admit I don't know enough about rhyming patterns in poetry etc, as i've never taught a ballad before but I can grasp the basics. If a ballad has 6 stanzas with a rhyming pattern of abbbcca, would the next stanza be abbbcca or would it move on the the next part of the alphabet for example: ddeeeffd? I'm not sure and I have googled to no avail!

    Thanks in advance
     
  3. gruoch

    gruoch Occasional commenter

    Next section of the alphabet.
    All Shakespeare sonnets are:
    abab,cdcd, efef, gg
    for instance.
     
  4. Thank you that was what i thought but i wanted to be sure before I taught it!

     
  5. ceesaw

    ceesaw New commenter

    Some ballads retain a repetive rhyme scheme thoughout the stanzas, some might offer some change or variation. I think the key thing is to identify where the rhyme scheme changes and why the poet has chosen to do this? E.g. turning point, change of tone/mood etc. In my opinion, while there are certain commonly accepted conventions for different forms of poetry, these are rarely upheld to the letter in good poems.
     
  6. markuss

    markuss Occasional commenter

    In a form such as the sonnet you move on to the next letter when the rhyme changes.
    If a poem has stanzas, all with the same scheme, then you'd say "It's abbac" [or whatever] in each stanza".
     

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