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Help with PGCE primary interview on thursday please

Discussion in 'Thinking of teaching' started by emma792, Jul 9, 2012.

  1. emma792

    emma792 New commenter

    Hi, I have an interview for a PGCE in upper primary on thursday. I have been away for 2 weeks, and only found out while I was away, so do not have much time to prepare.

    As part of the interview, I have to do a presentation.

    "Candidates are split into groups and individuals are asked to teach an aspect of the national cirriculum or Early Years oundation Stage Cirriculum that they have chosen and prepared in advance and brought with them to the interview. The presentation should be as if to a group of children (5 minutes)

    Consider how to make your presentation interactive e.g.
    - Well prepared resources
    - Strategies to involve other group members

    Remember that a creative and enthusiastic delivery is important (In our experience, the best prsentations have not relied on technological aids. Therefore, please note electronic whiteboards and overhead projectors will not be available for candiates use, although flip charts and markers will be provided)."

    I have been thinking a lot about this, and I would like to do a lesson on english, particularly creative writing and character building. One book I read suggested using a pie shape, split into sections, with likes, dislikes, fears etc. and getting the children to write the name of the character in the middle, and write words in the pie to desribe their character. If I did this, would it be a good idea to do an example as a group on the flipchart first, and then get them to do it themselves for their own characters?

    Alternatively, I could print out sheets with lots of questions, such as how old is your character, what do they do as a job, what do they look like, what is their biggest wish etc. and getting them to fill these in for their chosen character.

    I am very aware that I only have 5 minutes, and don't want to just set an activity, and get them to do it for 5 minutes, but I also don't want to just talk at them for 5 minutes because I want it to be fun and interactive.

    Another idea I had was a "hot seat" idea. I was thinking of dividing them into pairs, and one of them asks the other questions (who is pretending to be their character) and then they swap over. Would this be OK? Would you split them into pairs, or just have one person sat in a chair and the rest of the people taking turns asking questions?

    I don't know whether when making characters I should just be expecting them to pull a character out of nothing, or give them something to start with. E.g. give them a situation that their character is in, (survivor of a shipwreck on a desert island or something) and then they can talk about how they ended up on the ship, what their life was like before that etc)

    Something else I read online suggested passing magazines out, and getting the children to pick out pictures, cut them out and stick them on paper, and write about their character around the picture. At least then they have something to go off, (the way they look) and it might be easier for them to think about what they would do as a job, where they live, what they do etc. If I did this, I would probably just cut out pictures in advance, and put them all in a bag, and pass it around so everyone can choose one, because I dont want that part to take up too much time.

    I also did a drama group, where children made up their own superhero. It went down really well, and I was wondering whether to go down this route instead. It would introduce them to the idea of character building, but make it more fun. They can not only choose what powers they have/what name they have but also, their background, their family, how they got their powers, their biggest weakness etc. I was even thinking in pairs they could work together, and one could make the hero and one could make the villian.

    Whichever idea I chose, would it be a good idea to do a quick improvisation to develop their characters further, and make them think about how they would react to other people, and situations etc? Maybe like a "freeze game" where two of them start acting a scene out using their characters and then I say freeze, and swap another child in who has to change the scene but start in the exact same position that the other one froze in. If that makes sense? It's a bit hard to explain in writing.

    I know I can't do all of these, and I only have 5 minutes. I was just wondering if you thought any of these were good ideas, and if not where I could try get some more. I don't want to make it too complicated, it needs to be aimed at key stage 2, but I also want it to be fun. Obviously, they won't actually be children, they will be other appliants, but I have to teach it as if they are. If you think I should do more than one of these activities, what order should I do them, and how long should I spend on each one? I also don't want to rush, and seem unorganised.

    Sorry it is so long. I wanted to give all my ideas, so I wasn't expecting anyone to do it for me, but just get an idea on what is a good/bad idea and what is suitable for key stage 2.

    It says it has to be part of the national cirriculum, I can't find anything about this, but this type of thing is a part of it isn't it?

    Thanks
     
  2. emma792

    emma792 New commenter

    Hi, I have an interview for a PGCE in upper primary on thursday. I have been away for 2 weeks, and only found out while I was away, so do not have much time to prepare.

    As part of the interview, I have to do a presentation.

    "Candidates are split into groups and individuals are asked to teach an aspect of the national cirriculum or Early Years oundation Stage Cirriculum that they have chosen and prepared in advance and brought with them to the interview. The presentation should be as if to a group of children (5 minutes)

    Consider how to make your presentation interactive e.g.
    - Well prepared resources
    - Strategies to involve other group members

    Remember that a creative and enthusiastic delivery is important (In our experience, the best prsentations have not relied on technological aids. Therefore, please note electronic whiteboards and overhead projectors will not be available for candiates use, although flip charts and markers will be provided)."

    I have been thinking a lot about this, and I would like to do a lesson on english, particularly creative writing and character building. One book I read suggested using a pie shape, split into sections, with likes, dislikes, fears etc. and getting the children to write the name of the character in the middle, and write words in the pie to desribe their character. If I did this, would it be a good idea to do an example as a group on the flipchart first, and then get them to do it themselves for their own characters?

    Alternatively, I could print out sheets with lots of questions, such as how old is your character, what do they do as a job, what do they look like, what is their biggest wish etc. and getting them to fill these in for their chosen character.

    I am very aware that I only have 5 minutes, and don't want to just set an activity, and get them to do it for 5 minutes, but I also don't want to just talk at them for 5 minutes because I want it to be fun and interactive.

    Another idea I had was a "hot seat" idea. I was thinking of dividing them into pairs, and one of them asks the other questions (who is pretending to be their character) and then they swap over. Would this be OK? Would you split them into pairs, or just have one person sat in a chair and the rest of the people taking turns asking questions?

    I don't know whether when making characters I should just be expecting them to pull a character out of nothing, or give them something to start with. E.g. give them a situation that their character is in, (survivor of a shipwreck on a desert island or something) and then they can talk about how they ended up on the ship, what their life was like before that etc)

    Something else I read online suggested passing magazines out, and getting the children to pick out pictures, cut them out and stick them on paper, and write about their character around the picture. At least then they have something to go off, (the way they look) and it might be easier for them to think about what they would do as a job, where they live, what they do etc. If I did this, I would probably just cut out pictures in advance, and put them all in a bag, and pass it around so everyone can choose one, because I dont want that part to take up too much time.

    I also did a drama group, where children made up their own superhero. It went down really well, and I was wondering whether to go down this route instead. It would introduce them to the idea of character building, but make it more fun. They can not only choose what powers they have/what name they have but also, their background, their family, how they got their powers, their biggest weakness etc. I was even thinking in pairs they could work together, and one could make the hero and one could make the villian.

    Whichever idea I chose, would it be a good idea to do a quick improvisation to develop their characters further, and make them think about how they would react to other people, and situations etc? Maybe like a "freeze game" where two of them start acting a scene out using their characters and then I say freeze, and swap another child in who has to change the scene but start in the exact same position that the other one froze in. If that makes sense? It's a bit hard to explain in writing.

    I know I can't do all of these, and I only have 5 minutes. I was just wondering if you thought any of these were good ideas, and if not where I could try get some more. I don't want to make it too complicated, it needs to be aimed at key stage 2, but I also want it to be fun. Obviously, they won't actually be children, they will be other appliants, but I have to teach it as if they are. If you think I should do more than one of these activities, what order should I do them, and how long should I spend on each one? I also don't want to rush, and seem unorganised.

    Sorry it is so long. I wanted to give all my ideas, so I wasn't expecting anyone to do it for me, but just get an idea on what is a good/bad idea and what is suitable for key stage 2.

    It says it has to be part of the national cirriculum, I can't find anything about this, but this type of thing is a part of it isn't it?

    Thanks
     

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