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Help with observation re raising attainment in girls

Discussion in 'Primary' started by annie123, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. My head has asked me to teach a session with a group of 8 Y2 girls to show I would raise achievement in these girls.
    The girls are middle higher ability but are v shy, have no imagination and fade into the background in a whole class situation.
    The observation is for one hour and I really need to show how I can push these girls while making it girl friendly, fun and active.
    Any ideas gratefully received - thanks
     
  2. My head has asked me to teach a session with a group of 8 Y2 girls to show I would raise achievement in these girls.
    The girls are middle higher ability but are v shy, have no imagination and fade into the background in a whole class situation.
    The observation is for one hour and I really need to show how I can push these girls while making it girl friendly, fun and active.
    Any ideas gratefully received - thanks
     
  3. Talk partners? You don't say what the lesson is about so can't be of much more help sorry!
     
  4. Hi
    Sorry - it can be numeracy or literacy - anything to show how i can raise achievement in these girls who are happy to fade into the basckground.
     
  5. Andrew Jeffrey

    Andrew Jeffrey New commenter

    Have you come across the 'think, pair share' model?
    It is very useful for shy pupils and very similar to talk partners.
    In essence, you ask a question, get them to think about it for a moment, then pair up and discuss what you both think. Then each pair shares with an other pair on their table.
    I have found it an effective strategy, particularly for girls.I also use a phrase like "Think about it yourself, and when you have an answer, look at your partner. Only when you are both looking at each other may you speak." This has an amazing effect - give it a try with your year 2 girls!
     
  6. I'm a bit dubious that this problem is best solved by one-off lessons taken in isolation from the main group. Where I've had quiet children change it's been through losing themselves sometimes in the hilarity of classroom contexts-improvisation, drama, accepting where each person is and moving on. I've also specifically taught voice projection, and created situations calling for a louder voice, like shouting a warning to "someone in danger". Warm-ups like saying the days of the week with different emotions-very happy, very sad, angry, etc usually gets so much laughter and fun going that even the quietest children can lose themselves, amidst the whole class, which is a supportive environment for all its members. Humour, assertiveness, could be important ingredients.
    If some children are habitually quiet, it can be the vocal expression of a timid or unassertive relationship within the wider group, and may stem from home. the children just cannot see themselves as dominant personalities, do not think like dominating personalities, and though this can evolve and change over time, I think it can be potentially harmful if they come to see their habitual self as a "problem". Relationships to groups take some time to change, and in the end, I think every child has the right to be "themselves", to not see themselves as failures for being quiet.
    I'm mainly KS2 background, had a fair share of formerly quiet children go through my classes and lose their "quietness". If I were to specifically take a group with the aim of addressing their quietness, I'd focus on the things stated above-drama games, projection games, and probably puppetry which I have added since becoming a supply teacher. I'd also liaise with home and establish what their personalities are like there, and inluding school observations, consider what situations bring out their louder selves. I'd prefer to work on the issue within the supportive class context, and if there were non-supportive class members, work on those children too.



     
  7. With my girls like that I give them a special girls' group twice a week (this is maths) where six of them go out with the TA to look at the maths work we're doing that session (so they stay for my input and then leave, then come back for plenary). It means they have to do the work and have their say. They've fed back to me that they feel more confident because they know nobody's going to cut across them when they're telling the TA an answer.
     

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