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Help with mixed-age numeracy planning

Discussion in 'Primary' started by emmalga, Aug 20, 2009.

  1. I'm an NQT and will be teaching a year 3/4 class in September. I'm planning numeracy at the moment and finding it quite difficult. I'm currently taking lesson ideas for both year 3 and 4 (follwoing the renewed framework) and trying to fit them together, but it seems almost impossible to cover the objectives in the recommended two week slots. I've looked at the mixed-age plans on Hamilton but they follow the former NNS and don't always match the new framework and teaching in blocks. Does anybody have any advice on effective ways of appraoching mixed-age planning for numeracy?
     
  2. I'm an NQT and will be teaching a year 3/4 class in September. I'm planning numeracy at the moment and finding it quite difficult. I'm currently taking lesson ideas for both year 3 and 4 (follwoing the renewed framework) and trying to fit them together, but it seems almost impossible to cover the objectives in the recommended two week slots. I've looked at the mixed-age plans on Hamilton but they follow the former NNS and don't always match the new framework and teaching in blocks. Does anybody have any advice on effective ways of appraoching mixed-age planning for numeracy?
     
  3. | had a reasonably bright yr2/3 mixed class last year ( one of my yr2's was a level4 in maths!) and so worked from the yr 3 objectives and differentiated down in the activities to the yr2 objectives for the least able in the class. I linked the yr2 and yr 3 objectives( the mixed age plans from lancashire are really useful for this) but made sure I covered any stand alone yr 2 objectives too . The class were split by ability rather than year group so I had some yr 3's working on the yr 2 objectives and vice versa.
    You can work the other way ( from yr 3 objectives and differentiate up,) but personally I prefer to work down!
     
  4. I have taught mixed aged classes more than straight classes. In fact I have only had a straight class twice since 1997 !.
    I have a lot of experience teaching Year 3/4. Some love it, others hate it as it often depends on where your Year 3's are in terms of working independently.
    However, regardless of what year group they are you need to look at abilty. It is difficult to teach in blocks if that what is expected of you. Fortunately we have a maths co ordinator who accepts the schools problems with having 1/2, 2/3,3/4,4/5,5/6 and Year 6.Sometimes we do get straight classes but not that often.
    Therefore we are given the planning for all ability groups rather than year groups.
    I have a Year 2/3 (about a 50/50 mix) but will need Year 1,2 and 3 planning for my main planning but will need to take into account two children, one of which is at Rec level and another at Year 4.
    Thus I'll take my main objectives from where the majority of children's ABILITY is (this will be Year 2 objective) but then take objectives where there is a match from relevant other ABILITY year groups (Y1, Y3,Y4) for those children. HOWEVER, that is paper exercise. I will teach from Year 2 and differeniate accordingly.
    So if the objectives say something about number sequences, my Year 1 ability ( 1 child) may count in 1,s or 2's up to 20, my Year 2 ability may count in 2's and 5's up to say 50 and my Year 3 ability my count in 2's,5's and 10's to a 100 and my Year 4 abilty ( 1 child) will use sequences to 100 counting in 2's,3's,4's,5's and 10's.
    That isn't a ideal example but you should focus on the majority and differeniate. You cannot teach lots of different examples in a large ability class which Year 3/4 will be. You will have Year 2-5 ability !!

     
  5. As the above poster said, it easiest to choose the Year that best matches the general ability of your class, and then differentiate up or down.. I have mixed Y1/2 this year and have some very bright year 2s so am going to teach to Y2 curriculum, and dip into Y1 to differentiate down. They do match up fairly well, and tend to build on, so i dont find differentiation too tricky. Just try to get your head around the format and objectives and you'll get there!
    Just a point to make - it is not expected that you cover ALL the objectives in the block each time you teach a unit. You have the freedom to pick which objectives best suit your class at that time. They know theres no way you'll fit them into 2 or 3 weeks. What you can do, is choose the best objectives for your class in Unit 1, then when you revisit the block the next term for Unit 2, look back on how well they did on Unit 1 and work out if they need more on those objectives, or whether you can branch out to other objectives. By the time you've done Unit 3 you should have covered most of them and can fit in what you havent. Alot of the objectives are also quite general and be covered across the other units (Such as problem solving by adding, subtracting, multiplying and dividing..this can be lumped in with something on money for example.)
     
  6. Thanks for the useful advice. I think i'll teach to year 4 and differentiate down, see how it goes!
     
  7. You seem an experience teacher. May be you could help with my problem. I am currently teaching in a small school with only 19 pupils in my class however it is a whole KS2 class. I am finding trying to plan for the range of ability very challenging especially as I am aware that 8 pupils are Y6 so I need to be mindful of the SATs. Do you have any useful advice or know of any resources that would help me?
     
  8. Have you looked at the "securing level..." documents? Don't teach to the age, teach to the level.
     

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