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Help with behaviour, please

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by Betula_nana, May 5, 2011.

  1. Hi, I need some advice. I&rsquo;m coming to the end of my second year of teaching, last year being my NQT year. I moved to a new school at Easter. I&rsquo;m having trouble with behaviour in every one of my classes. It&rsquo;s only been two weeks, but I&rsquo;m actually becoming afraid of one group, which I know won&rsquo;t do. <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">I&rsquo;ve been reading the behaviour strategies on the pages, but none really deal with what to do if you have no control AT ALL right from the start. The school policy is basically to warn, move within the class, give a DT, send out. Unfortunately I have students who point blank refuse to move, and while I&rsquo;m trying to sort that out, the rest are up and running around the class, literally. One student constantly shouts out random, offensive words (he has no diagnosed SEN, I checked). The worst behaviour is by 7 students in a class of 15, so it&rsquo;s half the class &ndash; I can&rsquo;t send &lsquo;em all out, I&rsquo;d be ridiculous. They would not be quiet, from the word go, even to allow me to introduce myself, and start a few simple &lsquo;ice-breakers&rsquo; for a &lsquo;getting to know you&rsquo; in the first lesson. They will not be quiet for even the briefest, simplest task to be explained. </font> The girls get their phones and make-up bags out, and refuse to put them away &ndash; what can I do? I can&rsquo;t wrestle the stuff off them, and they refuse to follow any sanctions at all. They swear, to each other and about me, while not actually to me, and constantly make personal remarks about my appearance. This doesn&rsquo;t affect me on a personal level, but it means there are just too many fires to put out. My classroom is very isolated, students have to leave it by an outside route and walk around a building to get back into the main department, which makes it very difficult to send for help or send students to a &lsquo;buddy&rsquo; teacher. And to be honest, no kid would be prepared to go.
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">Also, while the policy is to send students out, it&rsquo;s frowned on, and seems to be taken as rather a failure. My other groups are just phenomenally noisy, and seem incapable of being quiet even for a two minute explanation. This has not been helped by the fact that before I started I was given no information despite asking - begging - several times &ndash; no classlists, no SEN info, no topic rotas, so I started not knowing ANYTHING about the stage the students were at, or what subjects I should be teaching, so my first few lessons have been, I admit, weak. I&rsquo;m now more up to speed, but don&rsquo;t know how I can possibly salvage any kind of positive relationship with these kids.</font>
     
  2. Hi, I need some advice. I&rsquo;m coming to the end of my second year of teaching, last year being my NQT year. I moved to a new school at Easter. I&rsquo;m having trouble with behaviour in every one of my classes. It&rsquo;s only been two weeks, but I&rsquo;m actually becoming afraid of one group, which I know won&rsquo;t do. <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">I&rsquo;ve been reading the behaviour strategies on the pages, but none really deal with what to do if you have no control AT ALL right from the start. The school policy is basically to warn, move within the class, give a DT, send out. Unfortunately I have students who point blank refuse to move, and while I&rsquo;m trying to sort that out, the rest are up and running around the class, literally. One student constantly shouts out random, offensive words (he has no diagnosed SEN, I checked). The worst behaviour is by 7 students in a class of 15, so it&rsquo;s half the class &ndash; I can&rsquo;t send &lsquo;em all out, I&rsquo;d be ridiculous. They would not be quiet, from the word go, even to allow me to introduce myself, and start a few simple &lsquo;ice-breakers&rsquo; for a &lsquo;getting to know you&rsquo; in the first lesson. They will not be quiet for even the briefest, simplest task to be explained. </font> The girls get their phones and make-up bags out, and refuse to put them away &ndash; what can I do? I can&rsquo;t wrestle the stuff off them, and they refuse to follow any sanctions at all. They swear, to each other and about me, while not actually to me, and constantly make personal remarks about my appearance. This doesn&rsquo;t affect me on a personal level, but it means there are just too many fires to put out. My classroom is very isolated, students have to leave it by an outside route and walk around a building to get back into the main department, which makes it very difficult to send for help or send students to a &lsquo;buddy&rsquo; teacher. And to be honest, no kid would be prepared to go.
    <font size="3" face="Times New Roman">Also, while the policy is to send students out, it&rsquo;s frowned on, and seems to be taken as rather a failure. My other groups are just phenomenally noisy, and seem incapable of being quiet even for a two minute explanation. This has not been helped by the fact that before I started I was given no information despite asking - begging - several times &ndash; no classlists, no SEN info, no topic rotas, so I started not knowing ANYTHING about the stage the students were at, or what subjects I should be teaching, so my first few lessons have been, I admit, weak. I&rsquo;m now more up to speed, but don&rsquo;t know how I can possibly salvage any kind of positive relationship with these kids.</font>
     

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