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HELP! Reggio Emilia approach/child initiated - planning

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by lilsuths, Sep 4, 2011.

  1. Hi all,
    I wonder if anyone can help? I'm starting as a Reception teacher and a Foundation Stage Leader in a new school. I have plenty of Foundatio Stage experience however my school want to try out the Reggio Emilia approach. I've done lots of researchand feel pretty happy about it but I', still really confused what to do about planning. If I'm purely working from children's interests how do I go aboutlong term and medium term planning?

    Any advice would be soooooo welcome [​IMG]
    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Hi all,
    I wonder if anyone can help? I'm starting as a Reception teacher and a Foundation Stage Leader in a new school. I have plenty of Foundatio Stage experience however my school want to try out the Reggio Emilia approach. I've done lots of researchand feel pretty happy about it but I', still really confused what to do about planning. If I'm purely working from children's interests how do I go aboutlong term and medium term planning?

    Any advice would be soooooo welcome [​IMG]
    Thanks in advance
     
  3. QuestionsQuestions

    QuestionsQuestions New commenter

    Sorry I have no information in that field for you but I thought that this document was very good
    http://www.ltscotland.org.uk/earlyyears/images/ReggioAug06_tcm4-393250.pdf
    There was a video on teachers tv about this approach before, I can't find it now though.
     
  4. I don't believe it! Here I am in W Australia and have adopted the Reggio approach for some years in my R classes. Now we are going down the pathway you are clearly used to.

    If you are being asked to take the Reggio approach embrace every minute of it. Plan as per usual BUT expect to change often and run with the children's ideas.

    I have a planning sheet in the Resources section called 'child initiated learning' or something similar.

    Have a look; it includes teacher-led, teacher-directed and child-initiated blocks of time.

    The child-initiated can look rather chaotic but that's the nature of young children and their interests.

    I used to brainstorm the children's interests and then gather them under an 'umbrella' for an overall theme.

    The one thing that is difficult is short term planning; two days is enough or even post-plan. Resources and materials can also be a limiting factor in the environment.
     
  5. I would plan along the lines of the materials and resources the children will have access to, and what roles the adults will be taking on. Think about the underlying philosophy, and how you can apply it in your setting, maybe even writing a short policy document. This will help you explain it to your team. The Reggio approach is called an 'approach' rather than a 'method' because it is so open ended, it's a way of thinking, and does not prescribe activities.
     
  6. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Julia can I just ask for your opinion of the EYLF?
     
  7. Also have a look at Sylvia Chard (Canada) Project Approach examples - they will really offer guidance. And Lillian Katz's work too.

    http://www.projectapproach.org/pre-k_to_k.php. I've done the Bugs Project and the Bones Project.Also my own on Gardening, and Houses and Homes, Community. My year ran - Myself term 1 (including bones), My Family/Houses and homes Term 2 (including pets - visit the Vet), Community Term 3 (traffic surveys as well People Who help Us type theme), and Insects and Minibeasts Term 4 (Bug safari,school garden, vivarium, etc). Community was brilliant as we had the local postie come in, any parents who were prepared to talk about their work - good with home offices, Meals on Wheels, Librarian, Lollipop person, Cafe owner etc. The environment is what's around you; The Weather is a fabulous Project and the kids get really into it. The discovery with Reggio gives a real opportunity to get scientific as well as all the other learning areas.

    I envy you!!
     
  8. Me ... opinionated? Perish the thought.

    Email me at juliasp_12345@hotmail.com ... and you can give me your opinion please.
     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Julia I know very little about EYLF and was hoping to get the view of someone who uses it.
     
  10. Bringing Reggio Emilia home is an excellent book - it will not help with the planning but is a very good read. Carla Rinaldi from Reggio Emilia does not expect other contries to 'do' Reggio but the philosophy is excellent and can be implemented in good EYFS practice without too much of a change to your planning.
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Bringing-Reggio-Emilia-Home-Innovative/dp/0807736600
    Making Learning Visible is another excellent book although very expensive now looking at this Amazon site
    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Making-Learning-Visible-Reggio-Children/dp/8887960259/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1315157566&sr=1-1
    I was forntuate enough to undertake a study visit to Reggio Emilia and bought my copy out there and I have used it for many different year groups since!

     
  11. sandyjohn how I envy you! Yes I too have the Bringing Reggio Emilia Home book. What is fundamental in your own 'setting' though, is that the local environment (and for me i would describe that as a kind of culture in a broad sense) affects much of how to adopt Reggio. If parents are working full-time they are not available to assist/contribute in school as much. I understand that in Reggio Emilia many of the parents and extended family contribute time. Is that correct?
     
  12. Msz EYLF sounds great. I know one of the contributors who is excellent in the EY field. Sadly, it is aimed at children 0 to Nursery age and not necessarily R.
     
  13. Hi Julia I would wholeheartedly agree that it is the culture and the environment ( both [hysical and emotional) that is transferable to my own school. The parents are crucial as it was mainly due to the needs and the hard work of parents that the first pre school opened. Parents are still a very important aspect of the schools and you can really feel how involved they are when they bring their children into pre school and again at the end of the day collect them. It all feels so natural, there is a lot of good chatting that goes on and there is no pressure to eith get the child in and go or to quickly collect then and go. Parents also help with exhibitions and when I was on the study tour we had dinner on the last evening in a pre school and the parents had cooked all of the food, set up the room and ate with us - it was a wonderful experience! I alos think we could learn a lot from the way the children and adults respect one another and talk together it is much more of a partnership and in the book Advisories the children leaving for elementary school have written a book for the new children and it is exceelent! You can hear the real voice of children throughout and also feel the real family of the pre school.I would love to work there but sadly coming to the end of my career and don't speak italian!!!!
     
  14. How is your class now with this approach? I am also interesting in this and wondering how easy/difficult it is???
     

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