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Help really needed maths investigation year 2

Discussion in 'Primary' started by jwhite1985, Jun 29, 2007.

  1. I need to do a maths investigation lesson to a class of 30 year 2 children. I am really stuck for ideas and really need to have a wow lesson that is going to impress big style.
    Any help is appreciated.

    Thank you in advance.
     
  2. I need to do a maths investigation lesson to a class of 30 year 2 children. I am really stuck for ideas and really need to have a wow lesson that is going to impress big style.
    Any help is appreciated.

    Thank you in advance.
     
  3. What topic/unit are you doing? It's helpful to try and link this in.
    Unless it's for an interview obv!!

    What areas are you strongest at?? eg calculation/.shape etc??
     
  4. AlongForTheRide

    AlongForTheRide New commenter

    I have done a few investigtions with my 30 year 2 children and they've got pretty good at them now. Some of the ones they really enjoyed were using the numbers 1-9 and 3 hoops, they had to place the numbers in the hoops so each hoop had an equal total. My top group are really bright so I let them work out the total themselves, but I told the middle group what the total should be. The middle group were happiest working practically with number cards and hoops (on paper) until they got the idea. After that they just looked at sets of numbers that equalled 15 and checked they'd used all the numbers. The lower group had the numbers 1 - 6 and their 3 hoops each had a total of 7. I let them move the number tiles around in pe hoops. We started off by reading the problem then getting them to explain what they had to do, in their own words. I placed the large number tiles and 3 hoops on the floor, and had the same diagram on my smartboard, then invited children to try placing the numbers so each hoop had the same total. I knew my top group would be able to have a really good go at working out what the total needed to be so I sent them off for 5 mins to work in pairs (with my TA observing) to see if they could work it out. The middles and lowers did a bit of trial and error until I guided them towards what the total should be. The higher group then explained how they found the total. They added the numbers 1-9 which equalled 45, then thought maybe 17 + 17+ 17 would work, then they went down until they got 15. I then let them have a go at finding as many different solutions as possible. My TA worked with the lower group. During groupwork I led the middle group into thinking about how they could use the solution they already had to generate another, e.g. swap a 4 and 3 in one hoop for the 7 that was in another. With my top group, we looked at some of the solutions, then worked out how to write them down systematically to ensure we had all solutions. I asked the children how they could record this to check they didn't keep finding the same solution - most chose to draw 3 circles each time and write the numbers inside. Two of my girls decided to systematically write all ways of making 15 with a 9 at the beginning, then an 8, then a 7, etc, then looked for 3 sets of numbers that used no repeats of the numbers 1-9. We have done some others as well, but if I write them here this post will be an epic!
     
  5. It is for an observation but its not my class or year group that why I am asking for help! Thanks for the advice so far.
     
  6. What about a division activity

    I recently did an investigation into how many different ways you can divide a number. I put a box of bricks on eac table and a challenge card with a number of bricks on it and let them investigate. They then recorded their findings in their books. The extension could be to try diffrent amounts.
     

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