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Help! Presentation/ Interview at SEN school

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by Finneyp, May 23, 2011.

  1. Hello,
    I'm finishing my Primary PGCE course and have an interview at a SEN school and they want me to give a presentation outlining how I would develop a curriculum for mixed foundation stage and non-foundation stage pupils.
    I know that differentitation is key and that setting LO's for each child is beneficial and that encouraging independence is important.
    I also know that having activities that the children use in rotation is usually how SEN classes work.
    Any ideas how I would develop a curriculum for these differing needs?
    I would be extremely grateful for any help!

     
  2. Hello,
    I'm finishing my Primary PGCE course and have an interview at a SEN school and they want me to give a presentation outlining how I would develop a curriculum for mixed foundation stage and non-foundation stage pupils.
    I know that differentitation is key and that setting LO's for each child is beneficial and that encouraging independence is important.
    I also know that having activities that the children use in rotation is usually how SEN classes work.
    Any ideas how I would develop a curriculum for these differing needs?
    I would be extremely grateful for any help!

     
  3. AngelEd22

    AngelEd22 New commenter

    You're right, differentiated work is the key. However you need to be careful about inclusion policies within the school. If you have too much differentiation, you risk excluding pupils from some of your activities. You need to include as many things as possible, which all of your students can take a part in, but to suit their learning needs. This is why you should make use of LSAs. It mentions DEVELOP a curriculum. So in order to develop it, you would need to make assessments of each child within your class using a suitable program. I work in secondary and further education so I can't really recommend any programs that would suit your age group. The results of your assessments will help you to set LOs for your pupils. Don't forget to mention accurate record keeping too. Have files for each student etc.
     
  4. Hi
    Begin with the Statement of Educational Need - this generates the Individual Education Plan (this is the document that should follow the child on a day to day basis) and then use the curriculum as a vehicle to 'teach the child' not 'teach the curriculum/subject to the child'.
    Google Portland College and see the resources built and downloadable by Pete Wells (ex Priory Woods).
    Differentiation - The curriculum should be multi-sensory and take into account learning styles nb. Visual, Audio, Kinaesthetic (VAK). Rotation has it's place, there would need to be differentiated activities (LOs) at each 'station' eg.
    • Joe can colour the clown as per the example finding same colour pencils independently,
    • Sara can choose the same colour from a choice of 2 directed by an adult,
    • Chris can use his communication book to say 'I see happy clown' 'I see sad clown'.
    Differentiating at each 'station' takes a huge amount of organisation. I prefer to do a whole class introduction - as multi-sensory as possible; with as many props, smells, sounds, tastes (where applicable) to 'hook' the children in - and when leading the introduction I can still differentiate because I know the children! Then they each have a work tray/or area with their activity and they work either in pairs with adult support or 1:1 with adult support - followed by structured choosing while we do our annotation and assessment for next steps learning. For many children this will mean a 'breadth' of experience at the same level because progress steps will be very very small.
    Remember 'outside environment' as an integral part of the curriculum.
    Excellent practioners: Lez Staves and Penny Lacey - see their work.
    Assessment - be aware of P-levels (performance descriptors before National Curriculum levels) and B-squared for example as methods of assessment for comparison. In Cambridgeshire the LA is introducing B-squared across all special school, and although it has limitations it does standardise assessment. Photographic evidence and accurate annotation is often most useful for SEN as the children learn best through 'activity' and there is seldom good 'produced evidence' - also when there is it has to be accurately annotated to show level of support given.
    AFL - still needed with SEN pupils - even at simplest level of 'traffic light fan' - they need to reflect upon what they have done (which may mean I sat at a table and played building a tall tower with an adult!). SEN pupils work best in short activity slots working towards an agreed reward eg. lego, spinning their favourite plate, playing with goo etc.
    Communication - with parents and other staff - they may know/have recognised something about the pupil and their learning style or preference that you have missed - very important to work as a team when using the curriculum to 'teach the child' not 'the subject' ..... and that's where I began so I think I have covered the issues I consider important.
    hope it goes well, Teresa :) (SEN teacher Language and Communication)
     

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