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HELP PLEASE!!! Y6 Proofreading

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Dixie1234, Feb 24, 2011.

  1. Hi all
    I could really do with your advice here.... Have got to do a lesson
    observation for a Y6 interview next week and I need to teach
    proofreading. Does anyone have any ideas how I could make this fun and
    creative?
    I've not found too much in terms of resources to help
    me, but I was thinking of starting the lesson by getting the children to
    work in pairs to decide upon the key areas that they think need to be
    checked when proofreading and use this as basis for discussion. How do
    you do it - all your ideas appreciated.
    Thanks
    Dixie
     
  2. Hi all
    I could really do with your advice here.... Have got to do a lesson
    observation for a Y6 interview next week and I need to teach
    proofreading. Does anyone have any ideas how I could make this fun and
    creative?
    I've not found too much in terms of resources to help
    me, but I was thinking of starting the lesson by getting the children to
    work in pairs to decide upon the key areas that they think need to be
    checked when proofreading and use this as basis for discussion. How do
    you do it - all your ideas appreciated.
    Thanks
    Dixie
     
  3. I know that my Y5 class were lazy about proofreading their own work, but LOVE when I make silly mistakes on the IWB so I regularly give them a piece of writing with deliberate errors that they could proof with a coloured pencil. I leave errors in punctuation and spelling as well as vocab, connectives and openers (i.e lots of short sentences which could be connected, dull adjectives etc and lack of imaginative openers). We discuss how editing for correction as well as improvement can level up their work. I always build in 10 mins for coloured pencil editing at the end of big writing and have started talk partners editing each other's work which has worked really well generating lots of speaking and listening as well as some hilarious 'teacher's comments'! I always ask them if they were surprised at how many errors they made before proofing and the answer is always yes. Most important thing is to make sure that proofreading becomes a habit and isn't a one off. it's an important skill to learn.
     
  4. It's late....forgive my lack of editing!
     
  5. Hello,
    depends on how long you have. I like to write a sentence full of spelling, grammar and punctuation mistakes on the board, tell them how many errors they are looking for and then get them to re-write the sentence correctly on a mini whiteboard. Then they swap boards and mark each other whilst one child marks the errors on the whiteboard. They really enjoy this as a quick literacy starter. Giving the children a longer piece of writing and some highlighter pens / coloured pencils and getting them to mark it also works well - the children love to play teacher.
    Good luck! I think this a good area for an interview lesson as you can make it interactive and interesting quite easily.

     

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