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Help please Whats the method?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by pinkglitterchick, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. HI all
    I am a secondary school teacher and I have a Year 3 daughter who is a summer born birthday (according to the school she attends this might make a diffrerence) and she is not confident in Maths

    We have been given a piece of homework called 'adding to the next number' which requires her to do sums like 183+???=200 or 369+???=200 but i have no idea of the method used to teach it --- do the children not get taught hundreds, tens and units anymore as she doesnt recognise that type of sum with the numbers over each other and carrying the one over etc...

    I am out of my depth any help would be gratefully recieved

    Thanks

    PGC
     
  2. HI all
    I am a secondary school teacher and I have a Year 3 daughter who is a summer born birthday (according to the school she attends this might make a diffrerence) and she is not confident in Maths

    We have been given a piece of homework called 'adding to the next number' which requires her to do sums like 183+???=200 or 369+???=200 but i have no idea of the method used to teach it --- do the children not get taught hundreds, tens and units anymore as she doesnt recognise that type of sum with the numbers over each other and carrying the one over etc...

    I am out of my depth any help would be gratefully recieved

    Thanks

    PGC
     
  3. Should the second calculation be subtraction? As 369+??? wouldn't equal 200. It depends on the age of the child. My school do teach HTU column methods, but it could be that she hasn't covered it yet. Look at the 'counting on' method e.g. 183 to 190 = 7, then 10 to 200. So the ??? must be 17.
     
  4. Milkandchalk

    Milkandchalk New commenter

    If it's adding on to the next number I'd show her it on a number line so starting with 183, draw a line ending with 200. Ask her to identify the next 10, so she should be going up to 190 using number bonds. Draw this on the line then ask her how many she now needs to get to the next hundred and add your jumps together to make 17.
    Does that make much sense?
     
  5. Do it by counting on to find the difference between the two numbers.

     
  6. carriecat10

    carriecat10 Occasional commenter Community helper

    I agree ... I think Y3 children will probably be rounding to the nearest decade number first. Ask your daughter if she does this using a number line. I would be expecting Y3 children to do this on a blank number line, but this may vary depending on ability and previous experience.

    Carrie [​IMG]
     
  7. Agree with above- best method at this age is to count in units (using numberline/hundred square or blank number line) to the next lot of 10 (i.e. 190) and then hopefuly she can 'jump on' one lot of ten to 200 without much trouble.
    For subtraction, draw a blank number line and jump back in manageable 'jumps' to the desired number.
    369 jump back 9, jump back 60, jump back 100.
    In the end she has to find what is efficient and accurate for her- but this is the common method at Y3.
    ALWAYS as her to try and estimate the answer and think about how accurate the estimate was when you have worked the calculation out.
    Re. summer birthday- yes there's some correlation between attainment and term of birth nationally, but it's not an excuse. The expectation is that these children are tracked closely and intervention put in place to 'close the gap'. With honme and school working together I am sure you can help her.
    Some schools produce a booklet of methods for the four operations for parents- ask her school if they have one. If not, message me and I'll send you the one we send at my school.
     
  8. MrsC@thegates, we have just been talking about the need to produce such a booklet and send it out to our arents. Please could I be cheeky and ask if you would mind sending me a copy so we have something to work from?
    Thank you, Clare.
    ceh111179@hotmail.com
     
  9. I have sent you a massage asking for a copy of the four operations booklet.
    mags2612
     
  10. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    I love your post because it reminds us all that what seems obvious to primary school teachers is no so to anyone else.
    I remember being confused by the greater than/lesser than signs my son brought home with his 'Seven a Day' homework. I's never been taught them as a child and they were utterly new to me.
    As a child, I never understood shopkeeper's arithmetic - counting up to the total to find the change.
     

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