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Help please! Preparing powder formula in advance

Discussion in 'Pregnancy' started by Coolgiraffe, Mar 14, 2012.

  1. Coolgiraffe

    Coolgiraffe Occasional commenter

    I'm so confused and can't get a straight answer online...

    I've been using cartons of ready made formula but for cost reasons want to start using powder. How on earth can you boil a kettle and wait for 30 minutes before mixing it during the night with a screaming baby wondering why you're not feeding her?

    How do you prepare powder formula feeds in advance safely?

    I've read stuff about using a flask or using a bottle warmer in the bedroom but I'm scared I'm going to male LO ill if I don't get it right.

    Coolgiraffe xxx
     
  2. Coolgiraffe

    Coolgiraffe Occasional commenter

    I'm so confused and can't get a straight answer online...

    I've been using cartons of ready made formula but for cost reasons want to start using powder. How on earth can you boil a kettle and wait for 30 minutes before mixing it during the night with a screaming baby wondering why you're not feeding her?

    How do you prepare powder formula feeds in advance safely?

    I've read stuff about using a flask or using a bottle warmer in the bedroom but I'm scared I'm going to male LO ill if I don't get it right.

    Coolgiraffe xxx
     
  3. nawoods

    nawoods New commenter

  4. LadyPsyche

    LadyPsyche New commenter

    Simple solution: When you boil the water to go into the bottles each day, just put the water in WITHOUT ADDING THE FORMULA. When baby is hungry/due for a feed, boil the kettle and put the hot water in a jug. Measure the formula into the baby's bottle, shake, and heat up in the jug for a couple of minutes. Takes virtually no time. Both my girls were happy to drink their milk at room temperature, so we didn't even bother heating it. I always carried a formula carrier (with pre-measured doses) and a couple of bottles of boiled water, so I could feed them on the go. If you haven't added the formula, the bottles of boiled water don't need to be kept in the fridge so they warm up faster. Cheaper and quicker than a bottle warmer! Hope that helps.
     
  5. spokeydokey

    spokeydokey New commenter

    Hi CoolGiraffe!
    I am not an expert with formula but one idea is to boil the kettle and fill up baby's bottles less an ounce in advance. Then when baby wakes or is ready for a feed, boil the kettle with fresh water and top up the bottle to the correct amount with the boiling water. Takes a few attempts to work out correct ratio to get it to a good temperature. But it means the powder is mixed with warm water and baby doesn't have to wait for ages for the bottle to cool :)
    So if baby has 4oz bottles, have 3oz ready poured with top on then boil kettle and top up to 4oz when they are ready for a feed. Mix in the correct amount of powder and shake and if still a little hot, stand in a jug of cold water for a couple of minutes.
    Hope this helps xx
     
  6. As I understand it the powder is meant to be mixed with water that is more than 70 degrees. Therefore what I do is keep cool boiled water in a sterilised bottle in the fridge. I then boil kettle wait a minute or so and mix at double concentrate. Then I dilute with water from the fridge. If you get it just right then it can be used straight away. I generally use cartons for out and about unless I know I will need to feed soon.
     
  7. LadyPsyche

    LadyPsyche New commenter

    Didn't know that about the temperature - my children were babies around 10 years ago, so it's quite possible (if not probably) that formula has changed in that time. Either way, they both drank it happily and thrived on it at room temperature!
     
  8. The formula must be added to water that is at least 70 degrees. This is to kill the harmful bacteria that may possibly be in the formula powder (it's not the water that's potentially dangerous, but the milk). The safest way to prep bottles in advance is to make them up with water at least 70 degrees, cool them rapidly under the hot tap then store in the back of the fridge (not the door). They can be stored for up to 24 hours, but it's best to use them as soon as possible. More advice here: http://www.nhs.uk/Planners/birthtofive/Pages/bottle-feeding.aspx
     
  9. I'm with swallowtail on this one, that's exactly what I do. I understand there's probably no harm in doing it the other way, but both the HV and the midwife told my partner and I that the formula is to be added to BOILING water to kill the bacteria in the formula. The boiling of the water has very little to do with bacteria in the water so adding formula to cold water makes little sense to me.
    When our LO was taking 6 bottles a day, we made them in batches of 3, cooled them in a basin of cold water and popped them in the fridge. We have a bottle warmer in the kitchen, takes 5 mins to heat through. Easy.
     
  10. I think in truth with the room temp thing if you use immediately any bacteria wont have time to multiply anyway. Also despite the powder not being sterile I suspect contamination of salmonella etc is far more likely to be from 'life of grime' type kitchens anyway!
     
  11. LadyPsyche

    LadyPsyche New commenter

    Their bottles were always used immediately. Why wouldn't they have been?! At the time this was what all of us moving from breast feeding did, as we were not keen on the whole cooling-reheating thing. I should add that in their combined time at school (around 10 years between them) they have had less than a week's absence between them. Certainly did them no harm. So back to the original point - agreeing with brettgirl2 - if it's mixed and consumed within the space of a couple of minutes, there is no issue with bacteria to contend with. It is warm conditions and time that allow bacteria to multiply.
     

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