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Help please - lost website

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by phatsals, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. phatsals

    phatsals Occasional commenter

    Could anyone please help me find website that has fantastic maths powerpoints saved to it. There used to be a link for it but I can't find it anymore. It seemed to cover every maths topic known to wo/mankind.
    Heartfelt sigh of gratitude if there is anyone who can help.
     
  2. phatsals

    phatsals Occasional commenter

    Could anyone please help me find website that has fantastic maths powerpoints saved to it. There used to be a link for it but I can't find it anymore. It seemed to cover every maths topic known to wo/mankind.
    Heartfelt sigh of gratitude if there is anyone who can help.
     
  3. Best ones I know are www.everymathstopic.com, www.emaths.co.uk and www.suffolkmaths.co.uk (in no particular order). If you can't find what you want on these you are very unlucky.
     
  4. DM

    DM New commenter

    There are many such sites. Give us a bit more to go on.
     
  5. Colleen_Young

    Colleen_Young Occasional commenter

    Agree with DM, there are so many useful free sites out there, I would not like to single out just a few.

    More clues needed.
     
  6. phatsals

    phatsals Occasional commenter

    All I can remember is they were made by teachers and saved to one place. The link was on thetutorsassociation under Secondary GCSE maths resources. That website seems to have disappeared along with all its links.
    Some of the powerpoints were repeated/copied under other teachers names - is that any help? Sorry to appear so ignorant by I'm a primary teacher and I used the site for particularly able Y6 children.
     
  7. After explaining I was English I was once asked in the States if I knew a guy called John who lived in London....I have the same feeling here.
    Try mymaths integrate
     
  8. Colleen_Young

    Colleen_Young Occasional commenter

    Are you thinking of the Teacher Resource Exchange?
    (Closing soon, contents may be moving - it's got one of those yellow banners across the top!)
     
  9. DM

    DM New commenter

    I can beat that. I was goldpanning on the American River when I was asked if I knew The Beatles. We were already down to the Fab Two by that point so the probability that I would leap up and say "Of course!" was not high.
     
  10. I think the probability of knowing someone that "they" know might be higher than we think. Weve bee in the States and met someone who had lived near us briefly and knew a few people that we know.

    An elderly lady down the road decided to move to Cornwall and promptly met my husbands aunt

    Etc

    I wonder if we could calculate the probability of two complete strangers knowing someone in common?
     
  11. DM

    DM New commenter

    Well the probability of a TESser selected at random being on good terms with Michael Gove is extremely close to 1 by all accounts.
     
  12. :)
     
  13. I thought the most famous Beatle in the US was the one Ted Bundy used as his vehicle of death. I take my hat off to their knowledge.
    I still think math(s) education in the states is more thorough age for age compared to ours whilst we are here
     

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