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help needed with year 1 pictograms and block graphs.

Discussion in 'Primary' started by emma891234, May 1, 2011.

  1. Hi I'm a trainee teacher.

    I'm going to be teaching year 1 children a lesson on pictograms and another lesson on block graphs. I'm struggling with how I could differentiate for these lessons. Would anybody be able to help please?
     
  2. Hi I'm a trainee teacher.

    I'm going to be teaching year 1 children a lesson on pictograms and another lesson on block graphs. I'm struggling with how I could differentiate for these lessons. Would anybody be able to help please?
     
  3. inq

    inq

    For block graphs I have used starbursts for my LA to actually make the block graph, we investigated are there the same number of each colour starbursts in each bag. The HA counted, made a tally chart and then made a block graph. We also did human block graphs in the playground of which was their favourite fruit, i then drew rouind each column so that they could see the finished graph.
     
  4. languageisheartosay

    languageisheartosay Occasional commenter

    If you don't have a suitable program to produce nice pictograms (and in any event it's very tempting for the kids to bash away adding things because it's fun rather than they exist!) you could use stickers that match to sorting toys. Pull a sorting toy (e.g. car) out of a bag and you get a car sticker to put in that column. Or just use coloured sticky dots to match to coloured balls coming out of the bag. [To stop them counting the sticker marking the column, you could prepare a suitable size grid, put one sticker per column at the base, and then photocopy it b/w so it will be different from the coloured stickers.Obviously for coloured dots, this wouldn't work! so you could scribble colour at the base. It depends just how differentiated you need to be!]
    For block graphs: if you have the sort of abacus that has sticks to put things on, the result on the sticks will be both tactile and a good visual representation. Mark the sticks by sticking the items being counted (e.g. coins or counting toys) to the base, one per stick, with blu-tak. Here (preferably) you add only one colour of block or bead to the sticks (i.e. all blue regardless of the item) to make it a 'neutral' block system. Hope you can see what I mean! Have fun.
     
  5. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Don't forget the differentiation that will come when you actually use the pictogram and graph. Lots of maths language there. Most, more,fewer, least, etc.
     

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