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Help needed with behaviour - Y3 child

Discussion in 'Primary' started by takethatno1fan, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. takethatno1fan

    takethatno1fan New commenter

    I posted this on the behaviour forum last week but had no reply, so now I'm worrying I'm alone!!!

    I have a boy in my y3 class and his behaviouris terrible. He belongs to a large family and his homelife is very unstable, school does not get any support from home whatsoever. He hates school and does not try and hide it. He completely refuses to complete work, destroys things that belong to other children, has been violent towards other children (not adults) and the other children in the class are suffering because of the amount of attention he demands. We have tried sticker charts, dangling carrots i.e. when you have done this you can do that......, keeping him in at playtime etc. but nothing seems to be working.

    I wondered if anyone has any advice or suggestions?
     
  2. takethatno1fan

    takethatno1fan New commenter

    I posted this on the behaviour forum last week but had no reply, so now I'm worrying I'm alone!!!

    I have a boy in my y3 class and his behaviouris terrible. He belongs to a large family and his homelife is very unstable, school does not get any support from home whatsoever. He hates school and does not try and hide it. He completely refuses to complete work, destroys things that belong to other children, has been violent towards other children (not adults) and the other children in the class are suffering because of the amount of attention he demands. We have tried sticker charts, dangling carrots i.e. when you have done this you can do that......, keeping him in at playtime etc. but nothing seems to be working.

    I wondered if anyone has any advice or suggestions?
     
  3. My first question is homelife, is it unstable enough to require further input? CP case? Therapy etc? Does home life require input. more than school? I'm guessing, but could it be the root of behaviour?
     
  4. cariad2

    cariad2 New commenter

    Are you trying to cope with this on your own? Speak to your SENCO and line manager and keep hassling them until you get some kind of report. Factually document all behaviour incidents - very time consuming, but useful evidence. If parents of other children are unhappy, encourage them to voice their concern to the Head. When he is very disruptive, keep sending for SMT for support. Sometimes support isn't forthcoming until parents or governors intervene, or until it becomes the SMT/Head's problem as well as the class teacher's.
     
  5. marlin

    marlin Star commenter Forum guide

    Can the SENCO get some outside agency help? Sounds as if it is needed if the school action plans haven't worked.
    Do you have a school councellor? We have someone who comes in once a week to work with children individually (and confidentially). We also have an art therapist. Have any of your teachers done mentoring training? If so, could they be called upon to help?
     
  6. takethatno1fan

    takethatno1fan New commenter

    Thanks so much for your replies. Your reaction is probably what I expected to hear; that input is probably needed from others; SMT and outside agencies.
    I just wondered if there was anything else what I could/should be doing. I want to do right for all the children in my class, including him but it is like walking on eggshells all the time.
    A great suggestion about documenting his behaviour.
    Thanks for your support x
     
  7. cariad2

    cariad2 New commenter

    I hate it when I make stupid mistakes, and don't notice them in time to edit my post.
     
  8. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    if he hurts other children, i do hope that you are informing their parents. they need to be hassling the head and the chair of governors
    I hate the tendency to put the worst, most violent children next to the good (usually girls) so they get theoir learning disrupted and get physically hurt.
    I have had the "pleasure" of supply teaching a mixed age class of the worst behaved together with the weakst academically and socially. I felt so sorry for the little timid, weak year 3 girls who were sat permanently next to thuggish "big" year 4 boys all day every day. Until the boys in question threw chairs etc and were then removed for an hour or so.
     

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