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Help needed! - Trying to motivate an Autistic (High Functioning), ADD child?!?

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by anon4582, Jan 26, 2011.

  1. Hi All,
    Is anyone able to help, been in similar circumstances, have any ideas/advice?
    Yr2 student in main stream infants with a diagnosis of High Functioning Autism, Attention Deficit and Sensory issues. Literacy/Numeracy not his best subjects and we're struggling to keep him motivated in class. Some days he's fine and on others, he's tired, bored, can't do it attitude.
    We've tried stickers, puzzle completion etc but we are getting such mixed results on a day to day basis. He's currently pending OT for sensory issues + speech & language review, and we know some of these issues can affect him day to day but...
    We're keeping a log of actions/daily activities and reactions along with home and liaising on daily basis - but any help or advise would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks [​IMG]
     
  2. Hi All,
    Is anyone able to help, been in similar circumstances, have any ideas/advice?
    Yr2 student in main stream infants with a diagnosis of High Functioning Autism, Attention Deficit and Sensory issues. Literacy/Numeracy not his best subjects and we're struggling to keep him motivated in class. Some days he's fine and on others, he's tired, bored, can't do it attitude.
    We've tried stickers, puzzle completion etc but we are getting such mixed results on a day to day basis. He's currently pending OT for sensory issues + speech & language review, and we know some of these issues can affect him day to day but...
    We're keeping a log of actions/daily activities and reactions along with home and liaising on daily basis - but any help or advise would be greatly appreciated.
    Thanks [​IMG]
     
  3. I work with a slightly older boy and I have a system of 'time tokens'. If he earns 5 tokens during the day, he goes with me to the hall and I let him roll around on the mats, climb on the horse and spin around as much as he wants for 20 minutes. It works really well and I have been using this method with success since September. He has his off days, but generally his entire day is in anticipation to using this time to meet his sensory needs, he loves playing tug of war!
     
  4. <font size="4">Thanks for your input - its a helpful area to consider [​IMG]
    Time tokens is a similar process used at home for 30mins play on the wii/computer, but at the moment this is limited to one day a week and weekends. Obviously a bit apprehensive of starting a habit or supporting too much use of gaming consoles at such a young age. I suppose the problem we have is that he's still waiting on the OT review to determine the extent of this sensory issues, making it harder for everyone. Everything we do it guess work!
    </font>
     
  5. Ask his parents if they have tried a non-dairy diet, or replacing cows' milk with goats' milk or a gluten free casein free diet. We switched our son (diagnosis of HFA) to goats' milk products hoping to get rid of a perpetual sniffle. There are lots of different caseins and people can be sensitive to specific ones. The sniffle remained but his energy levels shot up. He got colour in his cheeks and lost the huge dark rings under his eyes.
    Worth a try.

     
  6. Surely there is something that you know he enjoys not just the computer. Find a reward of some kind so that you can plan a now and next system. First work then a short reward then more work then a reward. He needs a reason to work until he sees there is some point to it all!
     
  7. Yes, he has various likes such as lego, cars, star wars, reading etc. The problem we have, is each type of reward we try works for a day or two and then no more. Are we making it too hard to achieve the reward? Maybe, I don't know. Should we keep changing the reward on a daily basis - we would need an endless amount?
    I think, because there is attention and sensory issues, it makes it harder to work around. If someone sits with him and verbally pushes him, making it fun, then it works. Doesn't this then constitute one to one support that teachers and TAs don't have time for?
     
  8. I've read your post - and the helpful replies- and agree with all of them. I think where you write that things may only work for a day or two is ,and will continue, to be true. Sorry !
    I have seen "Choosing Baskets" work well in Year 2. Each day of the week has a different basket, with a variety of things in. All are relevant but also have the element of a treat/OT activity. e.g. in Weds basket could be threading for FMS, sequencing puzzle ( for Sp+L target), mazes ( pencil control)plus books, sticker books etc. The idea is these are done independently.Thurs might have number dot to dots (FMS and number stuff), HF wordsearches.
    These are then given after a set time on task in the morning particularly after completing Literacy/Maths tasks. Preparing them can be a bit labour intensive but once you've got a basket set up it lasts for several weeks - about a half term I think. Perhaps the parents can suggest or supply some items from home ?
    The child that I have seen this work for has Sp+L issues, whereas you mention that this child is high functioning so some of this may not be as relevant.
    It sounds like you are working really hard for this pupil,do you get any input from Advisory ?
     
  9. Thanks Cole
    Credit goes to his teacher [​IMG]

     
  10. Could he have an area facing the wall, away from others with no patterns or distractions. Perhaps he could have a choose box with stuff he has enjoyed in it. Ideally he needs a clear visual timer so he can see how long either section would last.
     
  11. Sounds like a great team effort all round then !
     
  12. alm721

    alm721 New commenter

    My son has sensory issues and overlapping disorders of suspected adhd and asd. He finds everything very distracting and works on a one to one basis in a quiet area with the ta for direct teaching purposes. He attends to all sorts of visual and auditory inputs and as such finds just being in a classroom very stimulating. This means he is often not in the the right 'state' to learn. He has play breaks built into his day and does a similar, earning tokens for time to jump on mats etc in the hall as mention by another poster.
    You need to get the OT's recommendations work with them if possible. Does he have a statement etc? If not is it likly that paretns will push for one as this may get him more support?
     

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