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HELP needed - some different postive behaviour strateiges

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by bigkid, Jun 9, 2011.

  1. bigkid

    bigkid New commenter

    Inform the parents of the best 3 pupils in each lesson that they have been very good. Let the pupils know in advance how the best 3 will be chosen.
     
  2. I've been told (usually less politely) that I use an unusual strategy: I don't praise at all.
    I used to. But like you Lainy I ran out of puff and the pupils ran out of enthusiasm and the intended motivated class just didn't materialise. So, initially just as a dare, I stopped rewarding and praising.
    I can't adequately describe the feeling of a weight falling off my back. Instead of me trying to excite the pupils, I started to talk to the pupils about their work (not judging it, not critical). The result has been fantastic. I heartily recommend it. I haven't said "well done" for over 5 years now and, even after over 20 years urban secondary teaching, I love going in to work.
    Try it - it may astonish you!
     
  3. Interesting - 'no praise' at all seems a bit harsh, but focusing on the work and showing genuine interest works well most of the time. Children spot the hollow 'well done's and 'good try's a mile off and agree it become more and more meaningless if not heartfelt.
    Try focussing on specific reward/ class points etc for a specific type of pro social behaviour you want to encourage. Eg 'Paying each other compliments', or 'Starting the day positvely'. Describe specific ways they can acheive the points and reward weekly (daily with younger children). Make sure those that find the task most challenging get early recognition for any effort.
     
  4. [quote user="stillrollingalong"
    I've been told (usually less politely) that I use an unusual strategy: I don't praise at all.
    I used to. But like you Lainy I ran out of puff and the pupils ran out of enthusiasm and the intended motivated class just didn't materialise. So, initially just as a dare, I stopped rewarding and praising.
    I can't adequately describe the feeling of a weight falling off my back. Instead of me trying to excite the pupils, I started to talk to the pupils about their work (not judging it, not critical). The result has been fantastic. I heartily recommend it. I haven't said "well done" for over 5 years now and, even after over 20 years urban secondary teaching, I love going in to work.
    Try it - it may astonish you!
    quote]
    I like this strategy... it sounds like something you'd find in what we used to call 'education'. Glad it worked.

     
  5. Waiguoren

    Waiguoren New commenter

    Hello,
    Since you asked for positive behaviour strategies, does that mean that you do have and are using negative ones - sanctions such as losing housepoints, missing play, etc? I hope you don't mind me saying this, but if you've used all of those positive behaviour strategies and the class is still a positive one, then maybe you might want to be a bit stricter. The strategies that you list seem to be excellent positive ones, and if you're using them but still having trouble it might be time to crack down a little more.
    However, it is the end of term - and presumably there will be some fun activities for the children to look forward to around now and in the coming weeks? A reminder of these could work well as a reward - and a hint that some children may not be able to join in if their work isn't finished might work well as a deterrent!
     
  6. Waiguoren

    Waiguoren New commenter

    Yes - hollow praise can be counterproductive, and it is good to have an hinest talk with children. I think they appreciate it, as long as it's constructive, maybe in the same way that they appreciate good behaviour management, even if they don't like getting sanctions.
    I remember on my PGCE course a lecturer told us a story about a boy with behavioural difficulties who came to him once and said angrily, "My teacher finks I'm fick! I gave her a **** piece of work, and she said it was very good!"
     
  7. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    Regardless of all the people on here who may say what you are doing is hollow / you should be stricter / it's got nothing to do with education / you're exhausting yourself for nothing, while knowing nothing of what you actually are doing and what your context is, I'd like to say well done on doing all the right things and keeping up positive relationships with your class. I know it's hard work, but the benefits, as I'm sure you are discovering, are huge.
    Sounds as if you've tried most of the biggies. Perhaps a variation on something you've already done? I've seen big space posters or grand prix circuits used to measure the class behaviour points, and they worked eagerly toward reaching the Moon or the chequered flag. Other than that, why don't you as them which they prefer?
    But I'd like to say again - keep it up.I like your philosophy very much indeed.

     
  8. The job of actually educating children is hard enough without having to put time and energy into coming up with new reward ideas. You've used plenty already so ask the students what their favourite one is and use that until the end of term.

     
  9. Interesting.
    Wait a minute you berated some posters for making conclusions based on a lack of informtation then drew your own conclusion?
    Iainy says he is very tired and struggling to stay positive and upbeat - some benefit!
    Based on what Raymond? The very evidence that earlier on was not detailed enough to form an opinion on.

     
  10. This reminded me of the steep learning curve I had in my NQT year when I taught bottom set yr 8 science who could barely read and write, and were used to being 'spoon fed' work (a thing I hate!).
    The way I turned them around was by using the same strategies every week. These were: Not accepting any rudeness or minor misdemeanor at all however small, always having a seating plan, giving out good behaviour raffle tickets every 20 minutes (raffle of silly things held once every half term) and phoning home regularly - keeping parents in touch with positive and negative things occuring in the class. It took a term of consistency to gain their respect, but after that they were eating out of my hand! What was funny was they actually seemed to like the fact that I was really strict and that they had to earn my respect by working hard.
    That year all of these pupils passed their exams at least 1 grade above their target.
     
  11. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    I don't need "evidence" to compliment his / her philosophy, which is one of using strategies to build positive relationships with pupils. The strategies used are all listed - that's all the "evidence" I need; even if they are not working at the moment - and there is no "evidence" that they aren't - they are still representative of a philosophy I believe is right.
    As for berating posters, I'll leave that to you: you do have a habit of berating anyone who comes on here with a positive story to tell. I actually said despite what some posters MAY say - not what they DID say; I don't believe criticising hypothetical posters is a breach of netiquette.

     
  12. Fine but this doesn't really change the point I am making.
    And you a habit of berating anyone who questions them.
    Right.
    You just said you didn't need evidence?
    Look I haven't got a problem with you complimenting the philosophy of this teacher. My point is that you not using the evidence correctly. You said;
    Surely this implies that you think there is a lack of evidence on which to base a negative criticism which was fine until you used the same information as justification for your own postitive critique. You can't have it both ways.





     
  13. Raymond,
    THanks so much for your helpful and positive advice - just what i was after :)

    I didn't think i needed to go into specific details about my class as i was asking for positive strategies. Don't worry though, i have had to be incredibly firm and strict this year.
    Many of the children have terrible lives at home and need consistent consequences (especially on a Monday, after a hectic weekend :) ) However, when i heard about some of their circumstances i was keen to make school as happy a place as possible for those who do behave.
    It has worked well and i have had a successful year, just wondered if their was anything else i could try to "go out on a high". THe reason i wanted other strategies is because the class responds so well to them.

    Thanks to everyone who answered my original post.
    On a seperate note - has anyone else noticed that some people use this forum to pick holes in others opinions and make themselves feel better about their own practice. Makes me chuckle................
     
  14. Apologies for my post - I misread your post, thinking you'd run out of steam and your class had stopped responding to 'extrinsic motivators'. Hence the 'try something completely different'.

    PS. 'Punished by Rewards' by Alfie Kohn, might make an interesting read if you want to know why being ultra-positive has a short shelf life and possibly longer term consequences.
    Good luck
     
  15. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    No thanks necessary, lainey - you're the one doing the good job.
    And you don't need to go into specific details - there are just some posters on here who ask for endless nitpicking clarification in order to subvert those like yourself who come on here to share good practice. They never do the same to anyone with a horror story to tell because that suits their world view.
    It's their problem, not yours.
     
  16. afterdark

    afterdark New commenter

    What incentives?
    What about a "Reward lesson".
    Yonks ago, of course, I worked in a school where they had a system of reward lessons
    [if you don't agree or have already done this move on to the next post/thread, posting bile aimed at me is wasted..I am thick skinned as rhino nowadays]
    Apparently the head had agreed that it was better to have 16 good lessons and then one reward lesson. The children engage in some educational game often in tournement.The school had prizes to give out and everyone did it.
    I tried out some ideas for games and had wordsearches and other activities for those that got eliminated from the tournement.
    The number of lessons varied as I used an overly elaborate points system, but it sounds like you do that anyway.
    It can work well, there was one child who was demented who never responded to it but he was usually away.
    I found myself trawling car boot sales for unusual prizes.
    A jumbo bag of Maoam's made any class controllable. But ration them out for goodness sake.
    If the children are sugar sensitive record their names in your diary and keep them till the end of the day. Never give out vouchers they forge 'em.
    I am a sums person and love any game that engages the children and gets them involved in anything vaguely mathmatical.
    Consider math bingo as they can all play to end. Questions are sums the cards are have the answers on.
    It work a big treat at the end of term.
    At the end of the day remember
    they are children
    you are only human
    every child who grow up and stops you in street to say
    "thank you for the best teacher that I ever had" speaks for many.
    BTW have a learning intention written up in case some wally comes round to check, that happened to me playing bingo with a tin of Celebrations. Luckily I had written symbol recognition with my tongue firmly in my cheek.
    Don't leave sweet temptation in the way of the children. Some will not be able to resist it.
    And in case I forget, small stationery items can make nice little prizes. Especially for older students who are not as pampered [shall we say] as others; it stops them getting grief about coming without equipment when it isn't really their fault.
    The discussion about designer gear and mobile phones is another issue, decide for yourself the appropriateness of anything I have put here.
    I go to the extent of buying a labelling machine. [But that is another story]
    Good luck fighting the good fight.
     
  17. RaymondSoltysek

    RaymondSoltysek New commenter

    [​IMG]
    I'm a great believer in educational games as a reward. There are so many interesting things on the IWB and on the web now too.
     
  18. Why is a large proportion of the teaching profession so unwilling to defend their practice?
    I think there are very good IWB and web resources for learning but good enough to be considered rewards? Any good sources for such games Raymond?
     
  19. Didn't he basically tell you to make a poster?
    No doubt it's always nice to hear someone acknowledge this.
    A forum like this is one of the only places where teachers can talk candidly about the profession - I don't see the problem with picking holes in what others have to say especially if one thinks they are giving poor advice.
    I don't think so.
     
  20. bigkid

    bigkid New commenter

    Cognitive dissonance I imagine
     

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