1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Help! Literacy observation for early years teaching post! Ideas greatly appreciated!!

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by hana393, Apr 17, 2012.

  1. I was wondering if anyone could help me...I have a job interview coming up and for the observed teaching part I have to prepare a 20 minute whole class carpet session for 30 mixed ability Reception children with a literacy focus. The lesson should include an activity for the children to participate in.

    I have taught in year 2 twice and my final placement was in nursery, so I have not actually taught reception before. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated!! xx
     
     
                   
     
  2. I was wondering if anyone could help me...I have a job interview coming up and for the observed teaching part I have to prepare a 20 minute whole class carpet session for 30 mixed ability Reception children with a literacy focus. The lesson should include an activity for the children to participate in.

    I have taught in year 2 twice and my final placement was in nursery, so I have not actually taught reception before. Any ideas would be greatly appreciated!! xx
     
     
                   
     
  3. Start with a good story book. Choose one you know well, so you can read it without looking at it too much. That way you can keep better eye contact with the children and they with you.
    There are loads of ways of enhancing a story with child participation.
    I observed a candidate, admittedly with only half a class (15) tell a story and get children mark-making in response to elements of the story. Truthfully, I can only remember the children doing lots of yellow and circles to represent the sunshine in the story, but I'm sure it's an idea you could adapt for lots of stories.
    I also saw another use musical instruments to tell a story. If it's quite short or very familiar, you could tell it, ask children to choose sounds to represent aspects, characters, events from the story and then retell, adding the suggested sounds. If you have enough instruments this could involve everyone, or think of voice and body percussion. All children have the necessary equipment then.
    If you're feeling confident about how you will manage the children, you could involve partner talk, asking open-ended questions, or setting a problem solving sort of question the children can discuss with their neighbour, and you ask for a selection of their ideas. That way every child is involved, hopefully, in the discussion with other children.
    Hope this helps spark off your own ideas.
    Good luck!!
     

Share This Page