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HELP! Limestone/calcium carbonate

Discussion in 'Science' started by SCIENCETRAINEE, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. Hi all,

    I was hoping to find some creative people out there who can think of any inspiring/exciting ways to teach 3 x 100 minute lessons on limestone it's reactions and quarrying? I'm a trainee and want to make a good impression rather than teach the standard off-the-peg schemes and am totally stuck for finding inspiring ways to achieve this. The class are low ability (mainly D grade year 10s) with very poor behaviour and thus need engaging activities as much as possible!
    Many thanks in anticipation!


     
  2. Hi all,

    I was hoping to find some creative people out there who can think of any inspiring/exciting ways to teach 3 x 100 minute lessons on limestone it's reactions and quarrying? I'm a trainee and want to make a good impression rather than teach the standard off-the-peg schemes and am totally stuck for finding inspiring ways to achieve this. The class are low ability (mainly D grade year 10s) with very poor behaviour and thus need engaging activities as much as possible!
    Many thanks in anticipation!


     
  3. Hi
    If your class have very poor behaviour, you may want to think about ways to address this first as I would be concerned about doing practical with such students and yet they find this engaging. I would also attempt to break the lesson up into a number of activities - demo; practical, structured worksheet, etc so that you don't keep them on one task for more than 20-30 minutes. I have also found rewards help - whatever your school uses (I also use raffle tickets which students earn for - particular questions, good participation,staying on task, clearing away properly - you define. Then at the end of a given time period, you draw a ticket for a small prize - I have just bought an easter egg for our next raffle - cost me £1 in a major supermarket - medium sized - cadbury's flake one!)
    Anyway - back to your original question - there are some good practicals linking thermal decomposition of calcium carbonate to produce carbon dioxide - the test for which is limewater - which is also made from limestone. (Watch out for suck back when you do this prac and use pyrex tubes as high temps are needed)
    You can also show limestone being heated until it glows - limelight -----
    http://www.nationalstonecentre.org.uk/euas/appendices/chemlimestone.htm
    has details of the above experiments.
    Why not also make a card sort of the reactions - students can do, then if you give them a template, they can transfer as a record for their books.
    When you are teaching the issues around quarrying - why not get students to design posters for a protest march about having a quarry in their neighbourhood?
    Then - get each student to write a Quiz quiz trade question on limestone (question on top of piece of paper, answer at bottom, with paper folded over) - students circulate, on instruction from you, they stop, pair ask each other their question, swap and repeat.
    Finally - they can summarise everything they have learnt as a mind map or poster - give them headings
    Limestone - properties; uses, reactions of;environmental issues etc.
    Hope this helps

     
  4. This is a rather one-sided approach - perhaps the protestors might like to lose their jobs and live on Social Security? Does calcium carbonate have any uses (rhetorical question) - perhaps the protestors might like to forego those advantages? Or should it all be imported, because destroying someone else's environment isn't that important? [​IMG]
    If you can get your hands on the old SATIS, there was something called the Limestone Inquiry - this offers much more balanced suggestions. It probably features in the more recent SATIS materials (I'm retired, so can't access this) and was also in some of the curriculum materials, possibly 21stCentury.
    However, it's not exactly "original" BUT as a trainee, I'd suggest focussing on classroom management might be more beneficial than getting involved with curriculum development. That's not to decry introducing dynamic materials, but the scheme in your school has probably been discussed by experienced colleagues, resourced adequately and comes with technical support. Plenty of time to work on new ideas later in your career.
     
  5. Cut your losses and forget about limestone being interesting to a class like this. It isn't - apart from the lesson messing about making concrete.
    Just test and retest and detain ad infinitum... til they know the material for the exam
     
  6. Thank you all for your advice. Some really useful ideas! Will take on board all you are saying about classroom management too!

    Thank you!
     
  7. blazer

    blazer Star commenter

    +1 from me. pm me with an email address and I'll send you a powerpoint and some other stuff that may be of use. I haven't got round to uploading it onto tes yet. Limestone is a pretty dire bit of the syllabus.
     
  8. mrswallow

    mrswallow New commenter

    I'm 'lucky' I live near some fairly cool limestone features. Google image (other search engines are available) for punakaiki rocks, pororari river, cathedral cavern, kahurangi national park, and denniston. It may give you some gosh wow pictures....
    http://www.punakaiki.co.nz/walks/


     

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