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Help - how do you teach p-scale pupils?

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by lizlucy, Sep 13, 2007.

  1. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

    We have one year 7 student who is p-scale in Maths. The SENCO said in briefing that teachers should assume that he has no mathematical ability at all.
    We have pupils who are working at Level 2 when they come to us but the majority have 4's and 5's so we have no expertise at all at this level.
    He has been put in the bottom set with a TA with him but he is not really able to access the work they are doing.
    Are there any ready made resources out there? Any suggestions welcome.
     
  2. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

    We have one year 7 student who is p-scale in Maths. The SENCO said in briefing that teachers should assume that he has no mathematical ability at all.
    We have pupils who are working at Level 2 when they come to us but the majority have 4's and 5's so we have no expertise at all at this level.
    He has been put in the bottom set with a TA with him but he is not really able to access the work they are doing.
    Are there any ready made resources out there? Any suggestions welcome.
     
  3. I've taught a girl who is on the P scale for 2 years (and going into a 3rd). She arrived being able to occassionally count to 3. She's now up to counting to 10.

    I have a great TA who works with her in all maths lessons. She does completly seperate work to the rest of the class but we theme it so when we are doing number she does number, ditto for SSM and Algebra. When we do data she does extra number - normally to do with money.

    A few ideas:

    In algebra she does lots of work on patterns - we start a multilink pattern (Red, yellow, Red, yellow etc. etc.) and ask her to add the next 2 pieces or so. Lots of different colours, patterns etc.

    In number she does lots of things that use counting - playing little board games using a dice that we have made with only numbers (not dots) 1,2 and 3 on (she now uses a regular dice). Lots of count the clowns and trace over the partially written digit.

    In shape lots of sortin of shapes (big and small; red and blue; triangles and sqaures). Her SSM is strongest and she can recognise and draw many 2D shapes if you ask her to.

    About once a week she does a bit of "show and tell" to the class about what she has done and they love it. This week we all went outside and she showed us the shapes she had drawn on the playground using big chalk blocks we bought - she told the class what each shape was called. The class are very receptive to this time.

    The key difficulty is think up enough different things that work on the same core skills. We don't want her to become bored.

     
  4. You could use the idea of themes as a way of covering the same work again and again - so Shopping, Eating Out, Triangles, Horses, Music, Cars etc. Could she be set project booklets to work through with the TA?

    This is so difficult for the teacher to plan and prepare for (it wouldn't be the TA's responsibility in my school) and I can't see how the pupil can feel Included if doing seperate work to the rest of the class.
     
  5. is this a joke? You're asking people for 'ready made resources' for some kid we don't even know? Do them yourself! It's your job to provide work for this kid that they can access. And it shouldn't be stupid stuff like 1+3. Figure out what they need support with and provide it for them. Don't scour the web for some generic ****.
     
  6. mathman64

    mathman64 New commenter

  7. Brett - that's rather harsh. If resources exist or others have experience why shouldn't someone ask for advice? They can then cherry pick the wealth of ideas that people put forward to find the ones that would suit the pupil in question and add to this volume of resources where necessary.

    I don't teah from a textbook but do use them occassionally where there is an exercise or whatever that exists that meets my needs (why would I waste my time inventing an equivalent resource when I can spend that time buildign a resouce where nothing suitable exists).

    I am assuming that when you travel by car, bike or whatever to work you actually get in a ready made car that exists rather than building one yourself from scratch each morning?

    If a wheel already exists wy re-invent it?
     
  8. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

    Many thanks MathsHOD, your advice is very helpful and was what I hoped for when I posted.

    I was shocked by the response from Brett0401 as in the time that I have used the forum, I have only experienced helpful and friendly comments and his is verging on abusive.

    It is only since inclusion that we have been asked to teach p-scale and I personally (and none of our staff) have experience of teaching an 11 year old whose mathematical ability is that of an average child (aged 5) who has just completed a year in the Reception class.
     
  9. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

    Sorry forgot to say thanks to Mathman64 in my last post. Thanks for the link.
     
  10. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

    Incidentally Brett0401, this kid can't access stuff like 1+3, he doesn't know his number bonds.
     
  11. ian60

    ian60 New commenter

    I'm really out of the loop here.

    I don't teach in the UK, but I like to keep in touch.

    What is a p-scale pupil?

    'scuse my ignorance.
     
  12. A p-scale pupil is a pupil who works below Level 1 of the national curriculum levels.

    Basically the section below level 1 has been split into 8 p-scale levels. For example P scale 5 for shape and space includes "is able to identify the larger of 2 objects".

     
  13. kaitaz

    kaitaz New commenter

    Have you got access to Oxford Framework MAths SEN file? They have some excellent worksheets that match the mainstream lessons exactly so you don't have to plan different lessons.

    If not let me know what topic you are doing and I'll scan and email them to you so you can try them out.

    I teach a wide range of leverls from 2-5 in the same group and use them to pull in the lower ones while giving the brighter ones the harder stuff.
     
  14. mmmmmaths

    mmmmmaths New commenter

    This does not answer your question of how to teach at P scale level but I like the breakdown of topics for level 1 and 2 found here. Wondered if you had seen this.
    http://wsgfl.westsussex.gov.uk/ccm/cms-service/stream/ass...

    I also would like to know how to "get into the brain" of pupils who have no concept of number at all. I know it has to be practical as they actually have to understand what numbers actually are before they can do anything with them.
    I lack ideas.
    I also lack ideas of how to engage these pupils when the others in bottom groups can be working up to level 4 in number and algebra topics. (Shape topics etc. are not a problem).

    I don't have specialist SEN training to deal with these numeracy issues and don't know anyone who does. SEN department can't find anyone who does either including outside agencies! Any suggestions?



     
  15. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

    I did find these courses which I passed on to our SENCO but did not get a response from her. Must chase it up now you've reminded me.
    There look to be some useful ones if you scroll down, they may be helpful to you mmmmmaths
     
  16. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

  17. lizlucy

    lizlucy New commenter

    Just checked link and it goes to their homepage - you need to go to conferences and workshops along the top.
     
  18. ian60

    ian60 New commenter

    Thanks for the info MathsHoD

    Hats off to the folk who teach kids with such difficulties. It is beyond me.
     
  19. gepocock

    gepocock New commenter

    Boy, how great to hear of someone with the same worries as myself[​IMG] I teach in a secondary unit and the group coming up in Sept range from P6 to Level 2. Worried to death how I will be able to cope with this level of variation. It seems unfair that a TA needs to work with one pupil when there are so many others who will also need support. Thirteen in a class seems like a small class, but not with very needy pupils who may be operating cognitively at a very low level but hormones are still raging and they may exhibit extreme behaviour, ASD, ADHD etc etc etc. And there is still only one of me!!! Day one of the Summer hols and I am already in free fall worrying about Sept!
     

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