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Help! First day back.. where do I begin?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by primaryteacher12, Aug 11, 2011.

  1. I am just coming up to my first teaching practice. Classroom looking nice, planning on its way. The only thing that is terrifying me now is my very first day when the children come bounding into the classroom all excited. There are SO many things that they need to know- where to sit, behaviour rules, rewards, where things are in the classroom, what things are used for....the list goes on. Where on earth do I start at 8:45 on that thursday morning?! Some advice from experienced practitioners would be so helpful right now!
     
  2. I am just coming up to my first teaching practice. Classroom looking nice, planning on its way. The only thing that is terrifying me now is my very first day when the children come bounding into the classroom all excited. There are SO many things that they need to know- where to sit, behaviour rules, rewards, where things are in the classroom, what things are used for....the list goes on. Where on earth do I start at 8:45 on that thursday morning?! Some advice from experienced practitioners would be so helpful right now!
     
  3. bnm

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    What age of children?
     
  4. Forgot to say that! Year 3.
     
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    Is it a teaching practice (routines established) or your first class?
     

  6. My first class...
     
  7. bnm

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    OK.
    The first day you need to get them all doing something ASAP to calm their nerves and yours. The mistake I made was making that first something writing, as not all Y3 can write independently.
    I would go for something such as 3 squares on an A4 for them to draw, and write if they choose, 2 things they enjoyed over the summer and 1 thing they are looking forward to in Y3. I would do it on paper, so as not to stress everyone over what the first page in their literacy books looks like. I would use it as an opportunity to explain how you like the date written neatly, and underlined with a ruler.
    It will give you a bit of baseline information about their skills and levels of independence and, on paper, no marking if you so choose (and fab ones could form a display).
    Next lesson I would base on addition and subtraction skills-do lots on whiteboards and then some simple work, again to reinforce your presentation expectations, in books (eg they will need to be taught how to use a ruler to draw a margin, that you underline date and title, that question numbers go in margins).
    I find the best approach with a new class is to go into some "proper" indpependent working early on, but to use it as an opportunity to explain expectations. Things such as circle-time class rules are better done after you have "taught" the children for a while and established yourself.
    In the afternoon I would do some art/music/topic introduction work. The last thing you want to give yourself at the end of day 1 is loads of marking, as you will have day 2 to prepare.
     
  8. Thank you. In the mornings, the bell goes and the children come straight to the classroom- teachers do not go and 'collect' them from the playground, so I don't get to give them instructions as to what they do when they get into the room. As the children come in, do you think I should direct them to their clothes pegs and book bag boxes so they can take off their outdoor clothes, and take a book of their choice and sit either at a table or on the carpet, whilst they wait for others? Then I can do the register. Also what would you do AFTER the register - simply go through behaviour rules and then begin the first lesson?
     
  9. bnm

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    I would greet them at the door, direct them to (labelled) clothes pegs to take off coats and staright onto the carpet ready for the register.
    After register (assuming no assembly) I would go straight into lesson one. If you start by going through behaviour rules they will start getting bored and testing you straight away. In my opinion it's better to get straight on with the lesson and do a session on behaviour rules later in the day when everyone has settled sown a bit ( remember they will be excited, anxious and tired too).
     
  10. OK, thank you, you've been a great help.
     
  11. Hi,
    First of all, don't expect them all to be quiet when they come in! I'd give them at least 5 minutes just to wander around and chat to each other as some won't have met for weeks. Have desks / trays labelled so they know where to sit eventually and let them put their coats, bags, lunchboxes on their desks for now.
    Register then allocate pegs. Next thing I'd do is the class rules. Have a list of things you would choose but lead a discussion from the children, so they end up being their own rules. try and angle it to reach roughly the ones you thought of in the first place. No running, tuck chairs under, no drinking when adult talking etc etc.
    Next outline 'punishments' for those breaking the rules. Tell them they are breaking their own rules and what will happen when they do. Make sure at least one is 'caught' before break so they know you aren't a pushover!
    I'd have a story next, maybe a class reader and let the more confident readers read sections for now then perhaps a few minutes learning a times table before break.
    Expect to be talked about around the dinner table when the children get home!
    Good luck!
     

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