1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Help - a Polish pupil with no english is arriving in my class on Monday!

Discussion in 'Primary' started by jhp06220, Jan 17, 2008.

  1. I teach in Scotland P5 (9 year olds) and am getting a new pupil on Monday with no english whatsoever. I have an hour of Lifeskills (PSD) first thing so plan to use this to try and integrate her through games and pleasant activities, but am having a mental block!!! What games can we play that will be easy to mime out the rules?

    PE - I am hoping will be not so bad. Art, ditto.

    But later on in ICT we will be finishing our database work - which is not suitable for her at all, but needs to be finished. What can I give her to do there?

    Any ideas or activities greatly appreciated.

    What a way to ruin your weekend!
     
  2. I teach in Scotland P5 (9 year olds) and am getting a new pupil on Monday with no english whatsoever. I have an hour of Lifeskills (PSD) first thing so plan to use this to try and integrate her through games and pleasant activities, but am having a mental block!!! What games can we play that will be easy to mime out the rules?

    PE - I am hoping will be not so bad. Art, ditto.

    But later on in ICT we will be finishing our database work - which is not suitable for her at all, but needs to be finished. What can I give her to do there?

    Any ideas or activities greatly appreciated.

    What a way to ruin your weekend!
     
  3. gergil4

    gergil4 New commenter

    Hi
    I say hello in Polish - always a good start and usually gets a startled look and smile in response. Can't spell it, but a phonetic spelling is jen-dob-ray. Try getting all the class to try it too. Goodbye is doh-ved-zen-ya.
    I would get the children to say their names to her, and to practise hers.
    Also, a tour of the school with a couple of children; snap; colouring sheets; listening centre with nursery rhymes; ict - ceebeebies website has simple games; or ask you nursery/reception class for jigsaws and games which a few children could do with her so she's not overcrowded, but can interact without having rules to learn.
    Good luck.
     
  4. I think rather than try to mime out rules get her to watch the game played a couple of turns and then join in when the rules make themselves obvious. You can easily mime for her to watch and then join in. Try to make sure she has one of everything (tray, coat peg, etc.) before starting, as it's much harder to explain where to put everything when hers is different from everyone else's. Don't expect too much of yourself. You could use the medium of ICT for some assessment in your ICT, e.g. bring up some number games, change the language on Word over to Polish and see what her confidence in writing is like - how much can she type, is she able to locate keys, use menus, etc. you don't need to understand what she has written. Can't think of a picture topic you could get her to write about off the top of my head... Not sure if that helps, I have a P1/2 but over 1/3 are Polish!
     
  5. Most children are very effective at learning by copying others and don't want to stand out.
    Make sure she is sat with children who are going to be good general and language role models (not automatically your SEN groups).
    Visual timetables are very useful and ********** have a fan with pictures of toilet etc which are handy in those first few days.
     
  6. Hi, I had a polish student start in my class last half term with no English too. She's been placed in Y5 despite being 11, as her English is so poor. I would not expect too much from them. It will take a while for them to become comfortable in your class, and for them to build up the confidence to try to communicate with you.
    Assign them a 'buddy' or two, someone who will show them around school, sit with them in class, play with them at break. They will not be able to access the curriculum much, but learn lots from copying others. Despite the language barrier, they may have high attainment in certain subject areas (my pupil really excels in numeracy, and is just starting to get the confidence to offer answers in lessons).
    Does your LEA offer any support? We have access to 6 hours with a translator during their initial time in the school.
    There are a few sites which offer english-polish translation, some key words may be handy to have lying around for communicating with the pupil. An illustrated dictionary can also be helpful.
     
  7. last year the Head was showing a family around school- when in my class I asked how old the boys were, to be told one was going to be in my class- wondering when, I was told...NOW(and in he came!) He spoke Farsi (NO translator in our authority) and spoke NO english. I had no support for him and no advice was given- I also had a pretty tough class at the time.

    I must admit to using Starfall.com- an American site that speaks out letters, then words and stories- As I had very little time to spend on 1:1 with him, this was an activity he could do independently. Luckily he was a very keen learner- not overly bright but hardworking- He arrived around Oct/Nov and by summer was getting 3a's in Science ( having been read Q) and 2a/3c in Numeracy (Y5) Lit he was still quite behind, but mainly spelling/ irregular grammar- but he was a star. He mainly learnt initially by simply listening- mainly to his peers. One of his first phrases was... "it's well good"

    Are there any other polish children in school? I expect there is polish-speaking support from the authority- we had someone in a couple of times a week for the polish pupils. One thing that may be a possibility is that she may not have been to school in Poland- I had a girl like this- pretty tough trying to get her to count in english when she couldn't count in polish...
     
  8. K76

    K76

  9. teacherofmany

    teacherofmany New commenter

    At our school we regularly have new pupils joining who have no English and/or no experience of schooling. We do have a number of TAs who speak languages other than English and also try to place new pupils in a class with another pupil who speaks the same language so are perhaps better prepared than some schools. Where possible we conduct a first language assessment of the children's literacy skills although to be honest I don't know how useful this is unless the pupil has actual learning difficulties.

    I currently teach Y6, have recently had a Ghanian child join my class and on Monday have a child from the Congo (French speaking) joining too. Luckily I have other French-speakers in my class but, aside from ensuring everyone is wearing a name label and that the new child is given a tour of the school by a couple of friendly pupils, I will treat her as I would any other new member of my class - she'll pick up English from being around the others (especially in the playground - my experience is that swearwords usually come first!) and from the routine of the school day. As I have French speaking children they will explain to her that she can write in French (for Literacy, science etc.) for as long as she needs to but that I'd like dates and titles to be in English (they're on the board).

    As another poster has already said, depending on the child's previous schooling, it may well be that s/he excels at numeracy, science or other less language based sessions (ICT included). A Polish boy that joined my Y6 class last year speaking no English at all was an incredibly talented mathematician and also excelled at science - it was hard for him to move to England and not automatically be top of the class so he went through a period of 'opting out' of English rather than feeling as though he wasn't succeeding. That didn't last for long and he ended up with level 4 and 5 for maths and science in the SATs (was amazingly good at mental maths).

    Good luck.
     
  10. BeforeYouKnowIt is a great free resourse if you want to learn a bit of a new language. It has flash cards and says the word/phrase. If you have access to a whiteboard could the class learn a bit of polish whilst she learns english - may cut out on the embarassment.
     
  11. Thanks kesunder for that fantastic list of websites. The Bristol one was particularly useful.
    My most recent experience was like esme, "Here is X who is joining you today form Poland!" To my shame, and I was particularly stressed, I almost cried. Like many Polish children though, X is a joy to have in the class, very anxious to learn and able to calculate well, and despite knowing no English at all a few weeks ago, she is able to communicate fairly effectively. It has taken nearly a year and 2 teachers for my Portuguese EAL boy to reach the same standard!
     
  12. A few ideas on here:
    https://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...

    I'm struggling a bit with my latest Polish child, but only because she's been here a term and I can see she's really bright, but she's almost completely too shy to talk. All the advice is to let her start in her own time, and I know I must, but it's really frustrating as I'm looking forward to her blossoming!

    Each child is quite different, so just see how it goes. :)
    giggle. x
     
  13. I haven't been on here for a week, and what a pleasant surprise to get all there responses. Thank you so much. I am all set to go in early tomorrow to print off a few of these board games from the bristol site.

    So far so good. She's lovely and the rest of the class are falling over each other to be her friend.

    Thank you everyone
     
  14. Hello, I'm looking for teachers who have in their classes children from Poland. This year Iam writing my licenciate about adaptation of Polish students to the foreign school environment.I looking for teachers who could spare a few minutes of time to fill in questionnaire. I will be very grateful for any help. Thank you. Link to the online questionnaire: http://moje-ankiety.pl/respond-19653.html
     

Share This Page