1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Head overreacting?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by robyn147, Jan 21, 2011.

  1. My son's school has organised an enrichment evening full of events and activities linked to the curriculum. It is for KS1 children on a Friday night ending at about 8.30pm. Some parents asked if it was possible to pick their children up a bit earlier as they were concerned about over tired 5 year olds after a busy school week.
    So what would you do if you were in charge?
    a) Accommodate the parents' needs and either alter the times or allow the children to leave early
    b) Cancel the whole event and write a letter to all parents saying that he is very disappointed at the lack of support for the event as the school has always had enrichment events and the staff put a lot of effort into them and parents should be grateful for them and should not complain about it ending late on a Friday night.
    Well I'm afraid our head picked B. The letter was very unprofessional and has put the backs up many parents who did want their children to attend but thought it ended too late.
    It's a shame - I work with many parents and find that school communication is poor at best even at the best schools. My son's school is "outstanding" but for the life of me I can't understand the head's reaction to parents' legitimate concerns.
     
  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    My son's school has organised an enrichment evening full of events and activities linked to the curriculum. It is for KS1 children on a Friday night ending at about 8.30pm. Some parents asked if it was possible to pick their children up a bit earlier as they were concerned about over tired 5 year olds after a busy school week.
    So what would you do if you were in charge?
    a) Accommodate the parents' needs and either alter the times or allow the children to leave early
    b) Cancel the whole event and write a letter to all parents saying that he is very disappointed at the lack of support for the event as the school has always had enrichment events and the staff put a lot of effort into them and parents should be grateful for them and should not complain about it ending late on a Friday night.
    Well I'm afraid our head picked B. The letter was very unprofessional and has put the backs up many parents who did want their children to attend but thought it ended too late.
    It's a shame - I work with many parents and find that school communication is poor at best even at the best schools. My son's school is "outstanding" but for the life of me I can't understand the head's reaction to parents' legitimate concerns.
     
  3. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    It does sound a bit ott. But sometimes it can be the straw which breaks the camel's back I suppose. You know what it's like when you've had a bad day/ week etc and then at the end of it you get some parents moaning about the most trivial things.
    I can empathise a bit. Today I've had a really tough day - dealing with some quite serious cp allegations, having to break some bad news to a member of staff, I received an email to say that deprivation funding is being pulled ( about £15k) and another budget is being reduced by 2/3.

    This morning I had a child playing up for mum to deal with, then said mum crying for half an hour in the office, another mum complaining about nits- apparently I do nothing about them! In amongst this I'm trying to shortlist for interview, lead an assembly, give a welcome tour to a governor and I was put forward for a project but had to get an application in by 3pm, I got the email to tell me this at 2. Then a parent turned up to see me at 2.30, when I was midway through the bid.

    At the end of the day when a mum came to moan that another one of the parents had been giving her a hard time at night on the estate ( and that involves me how?) I could've punched her.
    Maybe your son's head just had a **** day.
     
  4. Milgod

    Milgod Established commenter

    What an odd time to put this event on.

    Not only late, but on a Friday too!
     
  5. SleighBelle

    SleighBelle Occasional commenter

    Hmm, tough one to call!

    Had the school provided opportunity for parents to attend meetings about the enrichment evening? Or were you just told that the event was happening?

    Would I be correct in assuming that it was not compulsory for the children to attend? If they did not have to go, but parents chose to sign them up for it, surely they'd have known when it finished and agreed with it before putting their names down for it?

    Without seeing the letter from the Head, I can't make a guess at the tone, but it sounds as though he should have waited to calm down a little before redrafting a more polite version! However, I can really understand his frustration. Do you really think he and his staff WANT to stay at school until 8.30pm on a Friday to run what is essentially a very long after-school club? Teachers don't get paid any extra for giving up their own time in this way, it involves a LOT of extra work and the Head probably reacted impulsively against complaints that this (unpaid, extra-workload, after school) activity was too late and needs to be changed or their children would leave earlier.

    Fault on both sides, I think.
     
  6. cally1980

    cally1980 Established commenter

    As a parent of a child in Yr 2, there is no way my son would participate in an event until 8.30pm on any night of the week, and definitely not a Friday, when I am lucky if he remembers what he had for lunch by the time he gets home! It really it not the right time to get the best out of children! It seems bizarre to expect children between the ages of 5-7 to do so.
     

Share This Page