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Head of History interview

Discussion in 'History' started by mrbrightside2010, May 19, 2011.

  1. Hi all,
    I have an interview on Monday for an HOD post in an average-ish comp school. As part of it I have to give a 10 minute presentation on 'Raising Standards in History'. I have a few ideas but I thought I would draw on the expertise of this forum. Any great ideas/good practise out there?
    Thanks!
     
  2. Hi all,
    I have an interview on Monday for an HOD post in an average-ish comp school. As part of it I have to give a 10 minute presentation on 'Raising Standards in History'. I have a few ideas but I thought I would draw on the expertise of this forum. Any great ideas/good practise out there?
    Thanks!
     
  3. kate harvey

    kate harvey New commenter

    Firstly, congratulations on being short listed!
    I always think that transitions are important for raising standards; between KS2 -3 and 3-4 (and 4-5 if A level is taught in school)
    For example, what do you know about the history that is taught at the feeder primary schools? Are skills taught in year 6? Do you have any access to data about your incoming students? One way of bridging this transition is to do a short “What is History” course which revises the skills they should have learnt in primary.
    Key stage 3 to 4 is also a big leap. How do you prepare Year 9s for starting GCSEs? We use a more challenging textbook in Year 9 (the SHP Britain and the First World War, which is actually a GCSE book), and place more emphasis on source analysis, which is what they tend to struggle with in Year 10. We also teach the examination “rubric” of the GCSE examination paper in Year 9, such as how to answer a 8 mark question. Introducing skills such as creating a line of argument , writing a balanced answer and making judgments can really effect achievement in Year 10. For example, in our Year 9 exam, we have a GCSE style question that is a quote, and then, “how far do you agree with the statement.”

    Other tried and tested methods for raising achievement in history are:
    Clear target setting. Many many different ways of doing this. Setting clear, national curriculum level-linked targets that are reviewed regularly, can impact on achievement.
    Ensuring that the topics studied at KS3 are relevant and pertinent to your pupils.
    Using a variety of teaching techniques and technology within lessons.
    Introducing an element of competition in scheme of work (eg: castle competition, essay writing competition etc ). This is particularly good for raising achievement in boys.
    History beyond the classroom; well organized and curriculum specific visits and trips can raise interest, motivation and achievement.
    Good luck!
     

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