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Having children overseas

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by tigi, Sep 10, 2017.

  1. Kartoshka

    Kartoshka Established commenter

    Most citizenships are acquired by blood, rather than place of birth. The USA is one of the few anomalies - if you are born there, you have a right to American citizenship.
     
  2. Fer888

    Fer888 Occasional commenter

    Many thanks for the link tk212. My daughter is a Chinese Citizen as mother is Chinese. It's just a pain they won't recognise dual nationality
     
  3. makhnovite

    makhnovite Occasional commenter

    'The USA is one of the few anomalies' - Argentina is an anomaly too, they will take all the citizens they can get!
     
  4. percy topliss

    percy topliss Occasional commenter

    We have had 2 kids whilst here in Bangkok. Great hospitals and both on schools insurance now. I guess it depends where you are.

    Perce
     
  5. february31st

    february31st Occasional commenter

    If you pay the 8500rmb fee to the British Visa Office you can get your daughter a Certificate of Ent to Right of Abode into the Chinese Passport. Then your daughter can travel and live in the UK until you decide when and if to obtain a British Passport.

    PM me for details
     
  6. MuffinMK

    MuffinMK New commenter

    Think about maternity leave, part time work after and respect for mothers and breastfeeding. Spain, for all its faults, got this really right. The UAE on the other hand is not somewhere I'd go to have a baby simply because part time is unheard of, maternity leave shockingly short and the working day ridiculously long if you have little ones at home who go to bed early. The idea of a nanny is awesome and cheap, but not actually that sensible in reality, if you care at all for child development, and occasionally safety. The nurseries are another story.

    Spain was meant to be all for C sections but I had the most wonderful and respectful natural birth. My baby was treated like a king and I was given all the support I needed. It was a 10, my birth experience in the UK was a 2 (services, nurses, skills, cleanliness, food etc.) Think births are luck of the draw, so wouldn't worry about word of mouth too much, maybe just look into individual hospitals. Seeing that a lot in the UAE, amazing and terrible experiences. Ps. I'm not selling Spain to teach in, it was terrible for so many reasons, just an example lol!! Goodluck.
     

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