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Have you seen the government’s new tool to recruit teachers?

Discussion in 'Education news' started by TES_Rosaline, Oct 27, 2015.

  1. Twinklefoottoe

    Twinklefoottoe Senior commenter

    Can someone post some links, past or present, to jobs advertised at £65k for a bog standard teacher with no management responsibilities?

    The truth is, and the reason why tens of thousands of teachers are leaving at an ever-faster pace each year, is that the job is now a killer. You face 12 hour days 7 days a week, with no social or family life possible or time for hobbies because you are so exhausted and irritable all the time. You will be constantly scrutinised and endlessly criticised. You will spend many hours of each day collecting meaningless data that is then 'analysed' to produced data you are expected to use, even though the data reflects nothing about your students. You will be drawing up action plans for hours for any student with a pupil premium or gifted or SEN and then keeping records about every one of them. You will have just a few hours each week to plan lessons, mark work, give feedback. You'll be attending endless meetings that don't directly help you but invariably pile more work onto you. The students' behaviour will wear you down in nearly all your classes and you will spend many hours trying to follow vague and unhelpful procedures that few understand and support will be minimal from your SLT. Your mental health will suffer. You may end up drinking too much, suffering constantly from stress, and developing physical complaints as a result. You will be constantly set impossible targets, which you can never meet and will therefore rarely get a pay rise. You will have to cope with run down schools, horrible money-saving classrooms and work in an environment where many teachers are at the end of their tether, burnt out and looking to chang career after just a couple of years of teaching.

    It's a toxic, horrible, stressful, dangerous, poorly paid, non-professional job now, in which you will never be trusted.
     
  2. drek

    drek Lead commenter

    @twinklefoottoes.
    That has described a lot of teachers careers thus far. I would add, Nor can you trust those around you.
    Some parts of other people's job, in order to climb up the ladder, is to gather information about you, from students (that teacher gave me a detention for doing nothing wrong), from parents (my child never swears, chats etc; if they did it is the teacher's fault, they could not understand the instruction), and other members of staff, (that teacher went swimming in the leisure centre, in the town where they live and work, how weird, or, ThAT student never gives ME any trouble, they are adorable) and share it with other 'lead' staff.
    This information is used to decide whether you have a good relationship with students, and whether you fit in and what path your career should take.
    The next year, it will be 'results'. The goalposts keep changing mysteriously.
    This is called best practice.
    What normal people in other workplaces would call GOSSIP, fair enough its up to the bosses, but in teaching the HT can call it professionalism, and refuse to write a standard reference, no matter how long you've worked at the school!
    More like professional suicide if one decides to join teaching.
    On apprentice, the sugar daddy can sack someone for not being 'ruthless' enough when playing the selling game, and they can go to become mini celebs.
    Not the same in teaching darlings!
    Once you've been sugared, you are supposed to crawl undignifiedly into the nearest hole, be a good chap and disappear quietly into the night.
    No media spotlight on this sort of thing! Like rape, it is just one of those things that happens to other unfortunate people.
    And everyone has an opinion about the victim whether they know them or not!
     
  3. JessicaRabbit1

    JessicaRabbit1 Senior commenter

    [QUOTE="
    The truth is, and the reason why tens of thousands of teachers are leaving at an ever-faster pace each year, is that the job is now a killer. You face 12 hour days 7 days a week, with no social or family life possible or time for hobbies because you are so exhausted and irritable all the time. You will be constantly scrutinised and endlessly criticised. You will spend many hours of each day collecting meaningless data that is then 'analysed' to produced data you are expected to use, even though the data reflects nothing about your students. You will be drawing up action plans for hours for any student with a pupil premium or gifted or SEN and then keeping records about every one of them. You will have just a few hours each week to plan lessons, mark work, give feedback. You'll be attending endless meetings that don't directly help you but invariably pile more work onto you. The students' behaviour will wear you down in nearly all your classes and you will spend many hours trying to follow vague and unhelpful procedures that few understand and support will be minimal from your SLT. Your mental health will suffer. You may end up drinking too much, suffering constantly from stress, and developing physical complaints as a result. You will be constantly set impossible targets, which you can never meet and will therefore rarely get a pay rise. You will have to cope with run down schools, horrible money-saving classrooms and work in an environment where many teachers are at the end of their tether, burnt out and looking to chang career after just a couple of years of teaching.

    It's a toxic, horrible, stressful, dangerous, poorly paid, non-professional job now, in which you will never be trusted.[/QUOTE]

    I have handed in my notice to leave at Christmas, and am now facing the barrage of questions as to why I would choose to do this from some (although good friends and family know better than to ask why). I think I am just going to print this off and give it to anyone who asks because it sums up perfectly everything that has happened to me.
     
    drek likes this.
  4. monicabilongame

    monicabilongame Star commenter

    It speaks volumes about the perception of teaching in general that the govt. introduced the idea of 'teach first' for graduates - get a degree, get QTS and teach for a couple of years before going on to do something more interesting/worthwhile/better paid.

    Teachers are no longer expected to retire from the school in which they began their career (a friend has just done that - taught for 40 years in the same school, very successfully) - they are expected to stay no more than 2 or 3 years before moving on/moving up. Similarly, any old person can become a teacher having had a career in the police/army/industry etc.

    People are going into teaching because they see it as the easy option and when they can't think of anything else to do with their degree, and because they are suckered in by the advertising or the promise of bursaries or whatever.

    If the job of a teacher is portrayed as something to do until something better comes along or a short-tem job choice, it's not surprising that there is no effort to retain teachers long-term in any school or in the profession because there will always be someone along to fill the gap, short-term. So why would anyone want to make changes to the very things that cause teachers to leave?
     
    drek likes this.
  5. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    All the children in the advert were behaving, smiling and paying attention!
    The model had all the wheels!
     
  6. monicabilongame

    monicabilongame Star commenter

    Nobody's mentioned it, but I think it's a bit harsh to refer to Nicky Morgan as a tool....?
     
  7. Lascarina

    Lascarina Star commenter

    Lalaland!
     
  8. Lascarina

    Lascarina Star commenter

    Maybe it's a typo in the first letter.
     
    drek likes this.
  9. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    You are right, each tool has a specific purpose and we find them useful when required.
     
  10. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    They forgot the final bullet point, even if you spent a very productive career ensuring you were earning the higher rates of pay you'd be considered expensive as finances were squeezed, then be "encouraged"; (*according to these threads and the experiences of many) to use your transferable skills elsewhere to make way for the next batch.

    Little emphasis is placed on the cost of recruitment (including welcome incentives), induction, in house training and dismissal process when turnover is so high while your skills and experience are of little consequence in the expense debate.
     
  11. Compassman

    Compassman Star commenter

    Twinklefoottoe - Spot on. I'm going to use that elsewhere if you don't mind?
     
  12. lanokia

    lanokia Star commenter

    OK, I've got Channel 4 running and the advert keeps playing and it is really... really... REALLY... annoying.
     
  13. yfel_endwerce

    yfel_endwerce Established commenter

    Serves you right for watching 4 :p
    You should be watching something intellectual like Dave
     
    needabreak and Spiritwalkerness like this.
  14. NQT1986

    NQT1986 Occasional commenter

    I challenge Nicky Morgan to find 100 teachers earning £65,000 who are willing to be named, photographed and interviewed for the TES...!
     
    phlogiston likes this.
  15. Camokidmommy

    Camokidmommy Established commenter

    Wouldn't it be lovely if our jobs were that idyllic? Left alone to get on with it, with gorgeous rooms, heaps of resources, whole classes of motivated students and a great salary to boot! Not even a sniff of SLT to spoil things....

    Oh, sorry I didn't realise they were writing a fictional piece......
     
  16. xena-warrior

    xena-warrior Star commenter

    For £65K I'd have been prepared to put up with it for a lot longer.
     
    needabreak likes this.
  17. TEA2111

    TEA2111 Established commenter

    I'm sure I'm paid for 27.5 hours? (although put in no less than 55 hours a week)
     
  18. drek

    drek Lead commenter

    Someone tried to explain it to me once. Apparently, it is not that simple. On paper, they are paying you for 1265 directed hours over 195 days.
    They then use a financial calculator to turn this into a weekly hourly rate to convert it to 12 equal instalments.
    On top of that, a year is 365.25 days, and that .25 is taken into account into this weekly hourly rate.
    Gave me a bit of a headache, that discussion. I tend to work backwards from my annual pay to work out what I'm actually getting per hour.
    What I do know is that on the rare ocassion I manage a 40 hour week, including switching off completely from any 'mental' planning, I feel like I've won the hourly rate lottery.
    Then next week's last minute changes to the 'I want to see' list from line managers arrives...
     
  19. charlotte.johnson06

    charlotte.johnson06 New commenter

    I also thought it strange that the classrooms were pristine and that there were less than thirty children in the room?
     
  20. Anonymity

    Anonymity Occasional commenter

    I don't think it will do much to turn people on to teaching... But it may help to turn public opinion off teachers...

    You know...

    Having fun at school
    Playing with children from 9-3
    13 weeks holiday
    And earning £65 000 on top of that...
    Why on earth do these lazy teacher whinge and whine and go on strike all the time???
     

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