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Have you found any retirement books helpful?

Discussion in 'Retirement' started by gooddays, Feb 16, 2012.

  1. gooddays

    gooddays Senior commenter

    I think I have 88 school days left. You could say I'm in my "3rd trimester" of my retirement year. When I was at this stage of my first pregnancy, 29 years ago, I read over 30 pregnancy related books. I have begun the same process as retirement approaches.

    I am reading 2 books right now, 52 Ways to wreck your retirement...and how to rescue it, by Tina diVito (John Wiley & Sons, Canada) and You COULD Live a Long Time: ARE YOU Ready?, by Lyndsay Green (Thomas Allan, Canada).

    Any suggestions for my book list?
     
  2. gooddays

    gooddays Senior commenter

    I think I have 88 school days left. You could say I'm in my "3rd trimester" of my retirement year. When I was at this stage of my first pregnancy, 29 years ago, I read over 30 pregnancy related books. I have begun the same process as retirement approaches.

    I am reading 2 books right now, 52 Ways to wreck your retirement...and how to rescue it, by Tina diVito (John Wiley & Sons, Canada) and You COULD Live a Long Time: ARE YOU Ready?, by Lyndsay Green (Thomas Allan, Canada).

    Any suggestions for my book list?
     
  3. lindenlea

    lindenlea Star commenter

    I enjoyed "Wolf Hall" but I don't think you meant that.
    How about something about money or investement if you've got a lump sum coming up. I read a lot online - The Motley Fool and Money Morning can be really helpful.
     
  4. Apart from The Joy of Sex I'd avoid all books about retirement! The point for me is that retirement is completely for the individual. Most on here have been dutiful sons or daughters, caring spouses and parents and it's now their time. If you want to white water raft or arrange flowers it's up to you. I detest the 100 things to do before you die type lists. Follow your own instincts.
    For my part I was part time for the last five years of my career and the final step to retirement was probably easier. One tip though, get your finances sorted out.
    Best of luck.
     
  5. Just read my post. I'm still a caring spouse!
     
  6. gooddays

    gooddays Senior commenter

    Thanks for the suggestions. I think I'm well qualified to read The Motley Fool.
    Wolf Hall can be a post-retirement read.
     
  7. gooddays

    gooddays Senior commenter

    Hello, Peter99,

    Lindenlea's advice on reading about money matters makes sense to me. I guess I'm anxious about planning another career or supply teaching at the very least because I'm wondering if there will be enough money for me to "follow my own instincts". I'm "only" 57.5 and planning on living a long time. I need to sit down with my husband and look at the numbers.

    With children and health issues, I've been part time for 18 of my 31 teaching years. I've been full time the past 7 except this year and I decided in about October that I don't want the sole responsibility of a class again. I am enjoying this year because my teaching partner is responsible for the morning and I come in fresh at 1 p.m. We will send out our jointly composed report cards next week. It wasn't the burden that report card time usually is.

    What I have determined is that my pension will pay almost exactly the amount I am receiving for working half time. I've never done white water rafting, but I have done white water canoeing. Maybe I'm up for some more pure terror.

    Husband appreciates your book suggestion.
     

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