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HAS behaviour got worse?

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by jubilee, Jul 15, 2010.

  1. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    I enjoyed that link, Annie_Boxed_In!
    Perhaps serving teachers will print it out and display it next to the school sanctions list in their classrooms.
    I like Bill Gates more and more as time goes on, especially because he donates so much to vaccination programmes in the Third World and, with his wife, gets involved in projects. Often regarded as a bit odd and out-of-touch, your link demonstrates that he actually has a lot of common sense and a 'finger on the pulse'.
     
  2. Thanks. I have read this to my tutor group in the morning. I find that kids have these great expectations these days. Everything has to be endless fun. I've told them about the good old days when I was at school, where we wouldn't have dreamt of saying to a teacher "This is boring" I will probably get slaughtered alive for saying this, but I think kids expect to have too many rights these days. I had a really interesting experience recently. I decided that I would just basically let my kids have endless fun (I teach music) so I gave them four weeks of solid practical work. They very quickly got bored with this, and asked me to teach them some theory! i gave them out some theory worksheets today, and they worked quietly ( a first for this difficult class)....I'm concluding if I let them let their hair down initially, then they get tired of doing their own thing, and will stop rebelling against me trying to give them some direction!
     
  3. ' I will probably get slaughtered alive for saying this, but I think kids expect to have too many rights these days.'
    Not by me! Only thing wrong with this statement is, not enough people are saying it.
     
  4. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    I'm not, per se, against children knowing their rights. What annoys me is that so many of them think that their rights hold sway over everyone else's, including those of other children!
     
  5. I agree that children should have and should know their rights, however they seem to think that they have other rights...................I have the right to look on school as a social experience...................................I have the right to tell my parents that the teacher is picking on me, if she keeps interrupting my personal conversations in class........................I have the right to make my worksheet into a paper aeroplane, if I don't want to do any work.....................:)
     
  6. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    So true! Too many of them have learnt that they get their own way at home if they are persistent and obnoxious enough and they then use the same tactics outside the home.
    I've overheard many pupil conversations where they blatantly explain how they play one (separated or divorced) parent off against another to get the item or concert ticket or holiday that they want. "I just have to start crying and wailing and say that I'm so unhappy and he doesn't really care about me ", said one girl "and my Dad caves in sooooo quickly!"


     
  7. I had one girl say "I'm going to complain to my mother about you, and my mother ALWAYS believes everything I tell her"
    .......................................it's a shame that amongst all their rights, they rarely choose the right to remain silent! :)
     
  8. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    ....... or to be honest and truthful!
     
  9. Yes, wish I had a penny for everytime I heard "It wasn't me miss!" I could retire!
     
  10. I completely agree with both of you. I have two challenging classes this year, one a Year 10 set 3 (from what they call at school 'a bad year group') and one a Year 7 mixed ability group (yes, YEAR 7, hard to believe).
    I work at nice school in the suburbs of Birmingham. Yes, the catchment area has changed over the years so the kinds of students coming into the school is changing but, believe me, I have worked at a much worse school in the inner city. However, the problem at my school in particular is that you are viewed as a failure if you have to call SMT to each lesson you have with a group because you have that core group of students who think they have the right to not only disrupt the lesson you have planned, but jeopardise the education of their peers. That's what I find the most difficult to comprehend, that sense of 'I don't want to learn and therefore no one else in this room does either'.
    I had an incident on Friday with one student who I have to have removed every single lesson and it reached a point where he totally undermined me in front of the whole class. I was absolutely speechless, especially when a good number of the students just laughed. The 'good students' sat there with horror on their faces. For me, it has to be the most soul destroying moment of my teaching career to date. I have only been teaching for three years, and yes have had challenging classes, even worked at a school where I got spat at on my way to my car, or sworn at, but never had a group act like a pack of hyenas. I have spent this weekend actually wondering whether I do in fact want to have to deal with this kind of behaviour anymore. I did love my job but my two challenging groups this year have really made me wonder if this is in fact the career for me. I used to think I was a good teacher. I seek advice, I reflect on my own practice and I will ask to be observed to help me make adjustments so that the kids in my room will learn, however, I've slowly got to the end of my tether as I don't see how I can reach students who are poorly behaved, direspectful and lazy in a nutshell.
     
  11. Missy L : 'I used to think I was a good teacher. I seek advice, I reflect on my own practice and I will ask to be observed to help me make adjustments so that the kids in my room will learn, however, I've slowly got to the end of my tether as I don't see how I can reach students who are poorly behaved, direspectful and lazy.'
    I expect you are a good teacher. Contrary to the conventional wisdom, I strongly suspect that it's this kind of teacher who's being driven out of the profession in droves, as the job becomes increasingly deprofessionalized. That is, those who can find any alternative. It's NOT YOU; you have to try to keep that in mind. That's the only relevant advice I can think of; I'm not a behaviour guru, nor do I have any solutions for the breakdown of social values that results in the kind of situations you're describing. It makes my BLOOD BOIL to read all the apologias for totally unacceptable behaviour that are offered as an explanation for such situations; my God, if a student was subjected to even one episode of the rubbish that to which teachers are on a daily basis, just think of the uproar there would be! Disciplinary hearings, incompetency measures, maybe even court proceedings! But teachers--- who cares?
    Your SMT sounds like part of the problem. You sound young enough to get out; there are better schools and better managements than what you describe. Or retrain?

     

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