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Has anyone built pyramids out of clay with their class?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by sfm_81, Jun 2, 2011.

  1. Hi all, I have posted a lot on here recently, I am an NQT and seeking some advice about a lesson I would like to do after half term.


    We're doing Ancient Egypt, but so far the children aren't really that inspired, they have been overloaded on timelines and farming calendars and nothing that has really grabbed them.


    I want to get some clay and build pyramids. I think this could work well as a DT lesson as children could create the blocks necessary and then build up their pyramids from the base (rather than just making a whole block), and to differentiate I could get them to make different types of pyramid (step, smooth etc.) that will have different levels of difficulty to set up.



    I think this could go really far and have visions of setting up all the children's pyramids on long tables and putting down sand etc. to represent a landscape of Egypt, with the Nile down the centre.



    I've never done this before so am just looking for advice. What will I need? How much clay would I need for 30 children to make one each (or is that going to be too much??), can you get clay that will just dry overnight?



    Any thoughts/ideas/advice is most welcome, thank you. Sfm.
     
  2. Hi all, I have posted a lot on here recently, I am an NQT and seeking some advice about a lesson I would like to do after half term.


    We're doing Ancient Egypt, but so far the children aren't really that inspired, they have been overloaded on timelines and farming calendars and nothing that has really grabbed them.


    I want to get some clay and build pyramids. I think this could work well as a DT lesson as children could create the blocks necessary and then build up their pyramids from the base (rather than just making a whole block), and to differentiate I could get them to make different types of pyramid (step, smooth etc.) that will have different levels of difficulty to set up.



    I think this could go really far and have visions of setting up all the children's pyramids on long tables and putting down sand etc. to represent a landscape of Egypt, with the Nile down the centre.



    I've never done this before so am just looking for advice. What will I need? How much clay would I need for 30 children to make one each (or is that going to be too much??), can you get clay that will just dry overnight?



    Any thoughts/ideas/advice is most welcome, thank you. Sfm.
     
  3. what year group are you doing this with?
     
  4. Oh sorry should have said, Year 4.
     
  5. Could you not use modroc? It dries much quicker than clay and is easier to manipulate.







    If you use it... sorry about the mess. :)
     
  6. I think it's a great idea, but that one pyramid per child would be unmanageable. I'd go for one pyramid per group. As you say, you could differentiate by pyramid type. Each group could work out how many blocks they would need by using lego first and scaling up - (meaning you get some maths out of it as well!). Could you weave in some moving vehicle DT, with groups working out how to transport their clay blocks to the building site? (rolling on logs/pencils, simple cart with axle and wheel.....)
    Air hardening clay is not very expensive. If there isn't already some in school, your local County supplier is probably your best bet.
    Good luck!

     
  7. eurgh - modroc sets my teeth on edge - i will do anything to avoid it
    but maybe that's just me
     
  8. Male mummies! We made a pharoah out of potatoes(heads) oranges,(bodies) fastened with garden wire. We took out the vital organs from the orange and placed them in canopic jars we had made from clay.
    We then mummified the pharoahs using a mixture of salt and bicarb soda and when they were diried put them in to sarcophaguses made from card - investigating nets.
    We then researched funerals and had a funeral complete with professional mourners. We then put these inside pyramids that we had made.
    Hope this helps!
     

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