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happiness :one thing all heads need to learn?

Discussion in 'Headteachers' started by oldsomeman, Apr 23, 2011.

  1. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-12935895
    have you all discovered this yet?
     
  2. Middlemarch

    Middlemarch Star commenter

    I'm sure I'd be a lot happier if I had his job.
     
  3. frymeariver

    frymeariver New commenter

    I'm a bit confused. Where does he say that headteachers "take themselves and their jobs far too seriously"? I thought it was a profile piece about his personal philosophy rather than about his view of education. There's nothing in the article about being a headteacher.
    Of course if it was about professional matters I probably wouldn't be happy to be advised by someone who is headteacher of a £10,000 a term private school. I'm not sure that his experience of working in education is the same as mine when it says on the school's website "We have increased our academic standard for entry and we expect every
    girl and boy to achieve their personal best in their exams, which in
    many cases are all A grades."

     
  4. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    Maybe he doesnt have to deal with crud kids who dont give dam if they gain nothing/
    happiess is what he wants.......but what is happiness for a school///all the pupils happy 'achieving' or happy to be there, away from the common lot.or happy they dont have to worry about some of the problems poor heads face in their schools/
     
  5. I was intrigued so followed the link too. Sounds like he tries to encourage children to try new things and learn from their mistakes and try to enjoy the moment. He says he tries not to worry. Helping children to become more resilient is a good call. There is perhaps useful with spoilt and messed up rich kids who can become difficult and troublesome citizens who run large organisations eg banks and oil companies..A social threat worth tackling early on. I wonder what is done to encourage social responsibility? Maybe a bit harsh but Easter holidays over and SAt's and pension strikes pending!
     

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