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Handwriting- how to help them improve?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by charlielou3, Jan 28, 2011.

  1. Hi. I am a 4th year B.ED primary student and have just taken on tutoring a 9year old boy who is struggling with mainly his handwriting at school. He has previously been tested for dyspraxia, dyslexia, ADHD etc. he struggles concentrating for long periods of time and is a typical boy who does not like writing. He is currently getting things marked wrong because his hand writing cannot be read. If anyone has any boy friendly, fun, handwriting activities/ideas I would be very grateful.

    Thanks

    Charlotte
     
  2. Hi. I am a 4th year B.ED primary student and have just taken on tutoring a 9year old boy who is struggling with mainly his handwriting at school. He has previously been tested for dyspraxia, dyslexia, ADHD etc. he struggles concentrating for long periods of time and is a typical boy who does not like writing. He is currently getting things marked wrong because his hand writing cannot be read. If anyone has any boy friendly, fun, handwriting activities/ideas I would be very grateful.

    Thanks

    Charlotte
     
  3. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    What he needs is to have his motivation activated to have his writing be read & understood. So rewards needed.Depends on what he likes as to your 'reward'.
     
  4. I have a class of reluctant writers - Things we do every single day to help is 'fine motor skills' and I really feel that this has made a difference to their handwriting and ability to be more independent. Some activities are: Play dough, threading cubes onto string, threading pasta onto string, scrunching newspaper with one hand as fast as they can, competitive word writing such as putting a timer on the board and seeing how many times they can write their name, or other words or a symbol. We have hammered nails into wood, sewing, screwing screws into patterns - we are now working more towards typical schemes of handwriting but I found that the things listed above help build strength and confidence in their writing. Hope that helps :)
     
  5. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    Good ideas flimflam!
     
  6. We do lots of stuff for fine and gross motor skills as flim flam suggests.
    We also do lots and lots of patterning and individual support for handwriting. If you aren't sitting with them watching the 'mistakes' they are making and the difficulties they are having then you can't really help them fully.
     
  7. upsadaisy

    upsadaisy New commenter

    I did something radical with a child in my class this year.

    I told him to print.


    His pencil grip was fine, no obvious fine motor problems.

    But his cursive writing was insufferable. I couldn't read anything he wrote.

    I spoke to his parents and they were so happy with using this new style of writing.

    Now miracle of miracles, I can read everything he puts on the page.
     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Cursive writing is recommended for children who may have dyslexia/dyspraxia/ADD if you can establish fluid movements but it is important that the letters whether printed or joined are formed correctly. Good upper body stability is as essential as fine motor skills so itis worth checking and putting an exercise programme in place if needed.
     
  9. http://www.phonicsinternational.com/Joined%20Handwriting.pdf
    I think the best thing for improving handwriting - is handwriting!
    Lots of tiny step practice with nothing fancy - but model the exact shape and size you want on the page right in front of the student.
    The angular approach I describe on the pdf link is very successful.
     

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