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'Hands up' in FE?

Discussion in 'Further Education' started by ukulelemike, Mar 2, 2011.

  1. Hi

    I'm a secondary trained FE teacher who has been given a seriously noisy FE class and isn't sure what to do!

    Although a fab class generally, there are four 18/19 yr old blokes who get very 'carried away' in group discussion and frequently talk loudly over each other, me and other students. They're not being at all horrible so I've been rebuking them quite mildly, but I do feel I now need to control things as my classroom is beginning to feel like a lunatic asylum.

    Is it acceptable to ask for 'hands up' in FE or is that a bit high school?

    Any advice on this would be amazing.
     
  2. Hi

    I'm a secondary trained FE teacher who has been given a seriously noisy FE class and isn't sure what to do!

    Although a fab class generally, there are four 18/19 yr old blokes who get very 'carried away' in group discussion and frequently talk loudly over each other, me and other students. They're not being at all horrible so I've been rebuking them quite mildly, but I do feel I now need to control things as my classroom is beginning to feel like a lunatic asylum.

    Is it acceptable to ask for 'hands up' in FE or is that a bit high school?

    Any advice on this would be amazing.
     
  3. I simply ignore any individual who doesn't afford me the basic courtesy of letting me know they would like to speak. Really doesn't take them long to get the message.
     
  4. cariadwch

    cariadwch Established commenter

    A quiet non confrontational chat with these 'blokes' after the class about adult social behaviour conventions, such as listening, waiting one's turn to speak and respecting other's opinions could do the trick - hopefully they'll view the discussion as 'learning' rather than discipline. After all, the behaviour you described, while not 'horrible' is immature and wouldn't be tolerated in most adult workplaces.
     
  5. I recently did some peer feedback with one of my groups and set some ground rules- perhaps you could do the same for discussions- suggest a few of the rules and the students add to them?

    Mini whiteboards can help them to make a note of their thoughts whilst someone else is talking and then they don't forget it. It gives them something to think about other than talking as we don't want to discourage them from talking altogether do we because it's great?! It might just be the way to control it.

    I've recently been studying Golding's Lord of the Flies and considered using a 'conch' in lessons. Only the person holding the 'conch' can speak but look what happened to that...

    I still have shouters in my classes but I'm convinced they'll be trained in the art of 'listening' soon. Maybe you could do a listening activity with them at the start of a discussion? A short part where you read something out and they have it in front of them and have to fill in the gaps- this will train them to listen before a discussion. I've done this before a speaking and listening assessment in the past?

    Good Luck and let me know how you get on, I'd love to try whatever works for myself!
     

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