1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Guided reading confusion

Discussion in 'Primary' started by elizabeth1972, Aug 12, 2011.

  1. I'm trying to get ahead and plan a half-term's worth of guided reading sessions (hence my other post about Read and respond texts!)
    I'm trying to use some longer texts with my more able readers this year (Y3,4,5,6), and I'm starting off my top group on The Witches by Roald Dahl.
    I only have time for four sessions per week, for 20 minutes each. I have 4 groups, so the activities are:
    Guided reading with me
    Follow-up task
    Handwriting
    Word/Sentence/Text level work unrelated to guided reading book
    How do people manage reading longer texts with quite lengthy chapters? I've just read one chapter of The Witches at a slowish reading speed, and it took me 15 minutes. That only leaves 5 minutes for discussion. If I only get through one chapter per week, the book will last us for 22 weeks!
    Would it work if we read one chapter as part of a guided reading session, and then the children read the next two chapters silently instead of a follow-up task? That way we could get through 3 chapters per week. We could then read one shorter non-fiction text and therefore get through 2 texts in the term.
    My alternative is that the children pre-read 2 chapters per week where they would usually be doing their follow up work, having been given a reading focus. We then look again at those 2 chapters during guided reading time and discuss the text in relation to one AF. The small downside to this idea, which seems the most effective, would be that it would take 11 weeks to get throught the book - so only one text per term.
    Any thoughts?

     
  2. I'm trying to get ahead and plan a half-term's worth of guided reading sessions (hence my other post about Read and respond texts!)
    I'm trying to use some longer texts with my more able readers this year (Y3,4,5,6), and I'm starting off my top group on The Witches by Roald Dahl.
    I only have time for four sessions per week, for 20 minutes each. I have 4 groups, so the activities are:
    Guided reading with me
    Follow-up task
    Handwriting
    Word/Sentence/Text level work unrelated to guided reading book
    How do people manage reading longer texts with quite lengthy chapters? I've just read one chapter of The Witches at a slowish reading speed, and it took me 15 minutes. That only leaves 5 minutes for discussion. If I only get through one chapter per week, the book will last us for 22 weeks!
    Would it work if we read one chapter as part of a guided reading session, and then the children read the next two chapters silently instead of a follow-up task? That way we could get through 3 chapters per week. We could then read one shorter non-fiction text and therefore get through 2 texts in the term.
    My alternative is that the children pre-read 2 chapters per week where they would usually be doing their follow up work, having been given a reading focus. We then look again at those 2 chapters during guided reading time and discuss the text in relation to one AF. The small downside to this idea, which seems the most effective, would be that it would take 11 weeks to get throught the book - so only one text per term.
    Any thoughts?

     
  3. Instead of a follow up task, i would have them read the chapter you want to discuss the day before their session with you. this gives you time to really challenge and interrogate the text, without wasting their time and yours, just reading aloud.
     
  4. I also have 4 groups and spend between 20 and 30 mins a week with each group. I read with a group before lunch and ask questions, discuss the text etc with them, then ask them to read independently or with a partner from their guided reading group to the end of the chapter / end of next chapter etc during silent reading time after lunch. I give them a time limit - e.g. before next Tuesday or by Friday so they know when it has to be read by. It worked quite well with my Y4s this year.
    I know some teachers don't actually hear the children read during guided reading time and just examine the text but I like to hear them read during this time as it saves me listening to them at another time. I have a parent helper who hears them read their own books as well. We do, however, have excellent SATs results with good progress in reading and we have a lot of support from parents and the children (mostly) love reading so the kids in my class generally have a good understanding of a range of texts anyway. I would probably have to alter my approach in a tougher school!
     
  5. bumblingbee

    bumblingbee New commenter

    I've always got the next day's group to prepare by reading the text the day before so Tuesday's group would read the text for Tuesday during Monday's reading session. I would then hear them read the text on the Tuesday and we would discuss it, answer questions on it etc. And so on and so forth.
     
  6. At my school we are niot allowed to focus on anything other than reading during this time - so handwriting would be eligible.
    what about a non fiction group and a set of questions / facts to find out?
    reading corner - reading for fun
    audio books
    reading aloud to each other - practicing expression etc.
    hfw game
     
  7. We're having a big push on handwriting at the moment, so we've been asked to include a second session per week in guided reading time. We also include guided reading time as part of the literacy allocation, so we only have 4 literacy lessons per week, plus 4 x 1/2 hour guided reading slots.
    After much pondering, and taking on board suggestions here, and thinking about the logistics of not actually having many guided reading texts in each set for quite large groups, I've decided to read one chapter at a time with a focus on one AF, and then as a follow up get them to read the next 2 chapters with a focused, AF-based task. For some of the slower readers, one follow up session will not be enough to complete all this, so I've taken on board the suggestion of getting them to carry on during afternoon registration time.
    Unfortunately, I can't see a way of including pre-reading too... I'm going to trial it this way and if it doesn't work, try it next time with pre-reading rather than follow up.
    Thanks to everyone for sharing some great ideas. [​IMG]

     
  8. I worked hard last year on getting the parents on board here. They were asked to read with their children and then talk about the chapter. They could read a bit to them and hear their child read a bit. We then re-capped on chapter(s) read a t home at beginning of session. We didn't have trouble getting the books back to school (apart from the father who was enjoying it so much that he wanted to get ahead on his own!)
     

Share This Page