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GTP bullying?

Discussion in 'Trainee and student teachers' started by MasterMaths, Feb 2, 2012.

  1. Unless their idea of a lesson plan is something very different to mine, then 8 pages is ridiculous (I'm guessing somewhere near 1-hour lessons?). In fact, I can't think why 8 pages could possibly be a good idea.
    No, what you've described is not typical, not at all.
     
  2. Thank you. I had mentioned the problem with the lesson plan to the GTP training provider and they had said that some schools need to 'embed' this form of lesson planning. She had also said that when she was an NQT she had to put in that level of detail for every single lesson.
    To be honest I think the training provider did have some idea of what was going on but could not do anything about it since the school had quickly decided to put me on remediation.
    Thank you again for letting me know that it is not typical. Perhaps after some relaxation I can put the torture I have gone through behind and move on reapplying for a different route.
     
  3. I've applied for GTP this year and so whilst I haven't got experience of being on the course, I'm trying to see your position from someone with a lot of previous work-place experience in a challenging career and also with strong in-school experience, albeit on a voluntary basis.
    It worries me that you're willing to give up on your dream after the setbacks you're experienced. Is there no way you could've gone to your assessor/mentor and worked out a way to proceed when you realised things were getting out of hand? As a teacher, there are many ways to plan and carry out lessons and simply because they recommended an 8-page plan, didn't mean you had to accept that - could you not have gone to them with an alternative approach and proved to them that you were independent, able, competant and willing to learn?
    Teaching is no doubt a tough career choice but the fact that there are hundreds of people applying for every GTP course this years means that it's also very sought after. Taking up a place and then quitting is depriving another potential candidate from following and achieving their dream of becoming a teacher. In whatever workplace you are, there are staff who are approachable and those who are not. It's tough, but that's life and there is always a way to break through the barriers and make connections.
    I've got to know my supporting school and staff really well by volunteering and supporting classroom activities and they will know from the start what experience/knowledge I have. Surely this is critical for someone who starts on a GTP?
    Sorry if this sounds harsh, I don't mean it to be at all, and I hope you find your way into teaching in the future if that's what you decide to do.
     
  4. Sorry but I do think that your reply sounds harsh putting the guilt trip on the original poster ' there are hundreds of people applying for every GTP course this years means that it's also very sought after. Taking up a place and then quitting is depriving another potential candidate from following and achieving their dream of becoming a teacher'.

    Only they know what is going on and how they feel about the situation, I know many people this year that have had to change schools due to bullying and downright unprofessional behaviour from some of the staff in schools. Yes I agree that in any workplace you come across a mix of people but some people it is hard to break through the barriers and knowing who to trust.

    I hope you manage to sort out the situation and get a bit more support. Are there any other students you can talk to at the same school that may help?
     
  5. zoobiezoo

    zoobiezoo New commenter

    I'm not sure that everyone gets the chance to get to know their supporting school - I was taken on by a consortium along with many others, had no idea where i was going until the week before! (though I was very lucky, they are fab). I also have the benefit of experiencing the difference in the quality of support between two different placement schools - which can vary hugely.
    Being on the GTP scheme is a great experience but is also exeptionally tiring ( when I had 2 young children I managed a full time managerial job while studying for and gaining a 1st degree - still no preparation for this!!). I think you have to experience this course to understand that the pure exhaustion can make negative feedback very difficult to take - it's one thing to welcome feedback in a positive way, another to take constant negative feedback when you have worked your a*** off to do a good lesson, and you are then critisised for things your teacher tutor does all the time!!
    I can completely understand how you have had enough. But you just have to get through this course. Then you will have your OWN class and you will have the chance to be innovative, inspirational and outstanding - and (which is difficult to see in the current environment of constant observation and criticism) isn't that what made us all want to do this?
    I hope you hang in there x

     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    The GTP is a tough route into teaching and I don't think most trainees are fully aware of what they let themselves in for. The GTP course requires people to be able to show initiative and get up and running reasonably quickly. In my experience if the trainee needs a lot of 'hand holding' then they are not going to complete the course in such a short space of time. In my school some GTP's have had to quit because they rely heavily on the department to carry them - sometimes staff get an extra period to support GTP trainees but not always - so there is not time for checking lesson plans and explaining.
     
  7. Conrad81

    Conrad81 New commenter

    currently doing GTP, and it seems like everyone has the same experience as you. The mentors regularly state 'I had to do it, so do you'. I think they make it more impossible each year.

     
  8. Conrad81

    Conrad81 New commenter

    Man, your comment was insensitve.

    You don't sound grounded enough at all to be ready for the GTP. If you think school experience, observing, or helping out in a school can prepare you for this, think again my friend. Like another poster who said she got her degree whilst raising two kids, I did my MA whilst working full time and thought it was the hardest thing I had ever done. It was nothing compared to this.

    The way you talk about the GTP, almost amounts to hyperbole. I think you need a reality check.
     
  9. You don't sound grounded enough at all to be ready for the GTP. If you think school experience, observing, or helping out in a school can prepare you for this, think again my friend. Like another poster who said she got her degree whilst raising two kids, I did my MA whilst working full time and thought it was the hardest thing I had ever done. It was nothing compared to this.

    The way you talk about the GTP, almost amounts to hyperbole. I think you need a reality check.
    Working in the GTP supporting school two days a week, voluntary or otherwise, will undoubtedly help to prepare prospective GTP candidates for the actual GTP. How can it fail to, if the time is used wisely? Working closely with teachers and TAs, taking on roles to support children's learning and pastoral needs, organising groups of learners, finding different ways to approach the lesson depending on their individual needs and making detailed notes to reflect on is all incredibly beneficial. Of course the GTP is incredibly hard. Everyone I come across in education says the same thing, whether that be friends who've done it or colleagues who are going through it. I am under no illusion whatsoever and very realistic about the challenges ahead. I am simply arming myself with as much information, insight, knowledge and experience possible to make the GTP year even a tiny bit more manageable than it might've been had I been coming to it completely cold.
     
  10. No matter how much you may arm yourself when you are actually on the course that's when you realise that there is so much more. I had been working as a Science Tech for a solid ten months and had thought myself armed too however, when faced with the challenge it became impossible. I do think it is dependent on the school and the staff aswell. I worked in an inner city school with rough kids and unapproachable staff. However, good luck on the course!
     
  11. I'm sorry but I must disagree with this. I took 30% of my mentor's timetable. That freed up plenty of time to look at the plans. Also the teachers had time to go home and write up a four page analysis of my lesson they had observed. If they had enough time to write up this analysis then surely they must have had time to feedback on the lesson plans. Most teachers in the department also didn't plan for their own lessons. They had enough time to go abroad over the weekend.
    You will find that some schools don't accept showing initiative openly. You must do as you are told or else you fail on Q9. I think you have a very limited view on the GTP in that you have only been observing the training in your own school only and hence think it is the same everywhere else.
     
  12. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    When GTP's at my school 'take the mentor's timetable' that time is not 'freed up'. More likely than not - they are in the classroom observing or doing some 1:1 tuition with members of the class. They don't go and put their feet up and have a cup of tea!
    No one dictates how a teacher spends their weekend! They are entitled to a life you know.
    FOUR pages - Lucky you to get that kind of detailed feedback! Use the advice wisely - you will not get that level of support/feedback at any other point in your career!
     

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