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Growing beans

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by 3rdcrouchend, Apr 30, 2006.


  1. I am a NQT and have a year 1 class and we're about to start our science topic 'growing plants'. I want them to grow something in class that they can actually see. I think I remember growing broad beans with blotting paper (not that I think I have any blotting paper) when I was at school. Has anyone done this? Or would you recommend growing something else?

    Also I would like them to keep a record of it's growth. Has anyone got any good ideas for a bean diary or something?!?! Thanks!!!
     

  2. I am a NQT and have a year 1 class and we're about to start our science topic 'growing plants'. I want them to grow something in class that they can actually see. I think I remember growing broad beans with blotting paper (not that I think I have any blotting paper) when I was at school. Has anyone done this? Or would you recommend growing something else?

    Also I would like them to keep a record of it's growth. Has anyone got any good ideas for a bean diary or something?!?! Thanks!!!
     
  3. If you want to grow them like that you will need jam jars and blotting paper and you put the bean between the side of the jar and the blotting paper. The water climbs up the blotting paper and the bean will grow.

    The alternative is to buy some pots and plant them as you would outside - if you buy the plant out pots (the ones that you can plant straight into the ground and they break down into the soil) the roots will grow out of the bottom of these and the beans grow more quickly! We had a tray of these in our room and a few days after planting them you could see the changes.

     
  4. Don't know if this helps but if your school has the 'Heinemann Discovery world books', Stage C, contains a non-fiction book called, "My bean diary." This would be very useful to link in with growing beans and also cover non-fiction. You might have to beg, steal, borrow (or buy) a copy. Maybe you could use this as a starting point to making your class bean diary!
    Why not make a graph to record it's growth over a period of time too!
    Don't forget the stories at storytime, Jaspers beanstalk, Jack and the beanstalk etc......

    cadburybabe x
     
  5. HI

    Got this idea from this forum last year.

    Get some small re-sealable sandwich bags, and white kitchen roll.

    the children write thier name on the label and stick it to one side of the bag. They then make the kitchen roll slightly wet and put this in the bag, followed by the bean seed. Then close the bag but leave it open slightly so that a little air can get through.

    We sellotaped them to the window so that the chn could see them and take them down to look at without taking them out of the bag to record the growth in their bean diary.
    This also provided a lot of discussion about watering the seeds(condensation insde the bag ment that we didnt need to water them). However we left our shoots in too long and they began to break I think that once they have begun to get the leaves then they need transplanting.

    I think I used curriculum bank or Belair active science to record the growth on.

    Have Fun :)
     
  6. Oooh thanks keepsmilin37 - sounds like a nice activity and no need for blotting paper!!! Just need to get the beans now!!!
     
  7. Thanks cadburybabe - have just searched the net and found a copy of "My Bean Diary" which is not a big book - so not too expensive - thanks for your help!!!
     
  8. I'd offer a word of warning about naming the plants - or labelling them with children's names, should I say!

    We now do the jars one each but anonymously as it can be quite upsetting for the child whose bean is the only one not to grow - this can happen and we found it was better to give each child a bean to plant, then to plant some spares as well.

    It's useful scientifically to explain that not all the beans will germinate but at least this way all the children get to take one home but no one is left with a sad failed bean in 'their' jar!
     
  9. i found when we planted them on kitchen paper they were hard to tranplant later. So this year brought clear plastic cups - children filled them with soil and we put the bean down the side so it was still visable.
    I made a bean diary (simple A4 pages folded in half and hole punched with treasury tag) for children to fill in each week - and they took them home over Easter to fill in, some parents then took photos of the beans growing and sent them in to update their bean diary. excellent results - planted a few spares for children's who didn't grow and any spare we planted in the school garden for children to watch grow.
     
  10. Just out of curiosity how tall do the plastic cups need to be - or just normal disposable ones?!
     
  11. I want to make a class bean diary and am in the process of making a template. I'm going to use it as a way of putting in the features of an information book too. I would like a bean border I have looked but cant find one, does anyone have one?

    i would also like the link for the bean diary by heinemman, I looked on amazon but they didnt have it.
     
  12. I was doing a growth topic with year 2 children last year and we grew broad beans, using bottles of pop, cut the top of and cut a strip of sugr paper to fit inside the bottle, wet the sugar paper and put in bottle, put a little compost in, slot the broad beans inbetween the bottle and sugar paper and watch them grow. Make sure you keep watering the compost. CHildren worked in groups, put about 4/5 beans in each bottle ensuring that they were spread out. Worked really well, children recorded their growth over 4 weeks and results were brilliant. Ask children to bring in bottles, cheap!! works just as good as blotting paper!!.
     
  13. We did this but filled it with scrunched up newspaper. This holds the water well and is cheaper. Pul a dark walking sock over the bottle to make it dark to start with.
     
  14. May2

    May2 Occasional commenter

    Our Year 1 teacher is growing beans at the moment in cut off bottles and has been taking a photo each day or so with the digital camera and is displaying the A4 photos as a big diary on the wall. It looks really good especially looking back. They are now on day 8 and most are about 25 cm tall.
     
  15. Hi

    Am just about to start growing beans in bottles with my class. I was just wondering if they grow faster if they are in the dark at first, or not and if they do, how long should you leave them in the dark for before moving them again?

    thanks
     
  16. Pow

    Pow

    Last year my beans rotted, this year I soaked them overnight and they all grew except 1, the children were very excited and they have taken them home for half term. We also made bean diaries. After the holiday we are going to grow sunflowers.
     
  17. One of the reasons for putting them in the dark is to get the beans to put all energy into sprouting. Once they have started to sprout, bring them out to get them green.
    Plant them into the ground asap - stem about 4cm.

    We have done ths several times, and are finding that the beans self seed in the Veg patch. We haven't evenplanted a crop, but will be getting one!

    Beans and sunflowers are great to grow from seed - v quick.

    If you plant seedings - cos lettuce/curly lettuce are also excellent.Problem with snails/slugs? Use a bowl of beer to 'organically' deter rather than slug pellets.
    Remove the outer leaves of the lettuces reularly or they will never have a heart, but the outer leaves are truly delicious. Quick grwoing too.

     
  18. I did a rainforest topic once and we made 'Bottle Jungles'. Sent a letter out asking for plastic bottles (the big 2L Coke bottle type ones), stayed behind and stabbed a few drainage holes in the bottom of the bottles. The next day, the children put a scoop or two of compost in the bottom, and then poked four or five holes in with their fingers.

    I bought a load of fast-growing seeds like cress, broad beans, mustard seeds and a few more and mixed them all together in a bowl and the children sprinkled a handful into the holes and sprinkled a top layer of soil over the top with a squirt of water.

    After about a week, the cress started shooting up and, before long we ended up with wild, tangled jungles of intertwined plants shooting up out of the bottles! Because they were able to grow so large, there were loads of roots pressed up against the sides of the bottles so that was good to chat about too.

    It was good fun - I think I'll do it again this year, now I've reminisced about it!
     
  19. Coolgiraffe

    Coolgiraffe Occasional commenter

    I've seen an example on Pinterest using clear cd cases to grow beans, haven't tried it yet but it should look great on a display x
     

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