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Grid Method Year 4

Discussion in 'Mathematics' started by Daven7488, Mar 3, 2012.

  1. I'm a trainee teacher and i've been asked to teach grid method to a year 4 class on Monday. I know they can do it with 1x2 digit numbers because I taught them that, but now i've been asked to do it with 2x3 and 3x3 digit numbers, which involves quite complicated addition at the end, and i'm not sure if they would be able to handle it. I'm wondering then: is this expected of Year 4?
     
  2. hammie

    hammie Lead commenter

    try them with some suitable addition in the starter and find out. Some of them at least will likely surprise you.
    and if you are unsure plan suitable sums for their addition skills.
    25 x 322 for instance will give simpler addition that 678 x 94,.
    When moving on to a new skill, i always keep in mind which times tables the pupils involved are confident with, as if they are unsure of the table they will think more of that than the skill involved.
    With all young pupils starting with divisions with busstop method, i always encourage them to write down the tables list for the x table required for a particular sum. then they can focus on the specific skill and avoid silly mistakes that can discourage them and make them blame the skill as hard/
     

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