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GREASE the musical music, for school production

Discussion in 'Music' started by frazzy, Jan 10, 2012.

  1. Hello everyone,
    My school is holding the musical Grease in February however I have been given by the Drama teacher today the conductor's score for all of the songs and a few parts for 'Hopelessly Devoted to You' and 'You're the One that I want'.
    The issue I have is that I have no parts for any of the other songs so I can see myself arranging all the songs from the conductor's score for B flat clarinet, flute, electric guitar, bass guitar and alto saxophone all weekend!
    I wondered if anyone has already arranged the music and if so would they be willing to share the music with me for our production. I know some of the songs are being cut so if you do not have all the songs I would still be grateful for whatever you have! It would save me so much time and I would appreciate the help so much!!
    Thanks in advance Frazzy [​IMG]
     
  2. Hello everyone,
    My school is holding the musical Grease in February however I have been given by the Drama teacher today the conductor's score for all of the songs and a few parts for 'Hopelessly Devoted to You' and 'You're the One that I want'.
    The issue I have is that I have no parts for any of the other songs so I can see myself arranging all the songs from the conductor's score for B flat clarinet, flute, electric guitar, bass guitar and alto saxophone all weekend!
    I wondered if anyone has already arranged the music and if so would they be willing to share the music with me for our production. I know some of the songs are being cut so if you do not have all the songs I would still be grateful for whatever you have! It would save me so much time and I would appreciate the help so much!!
    Thanks in advance Frazzy [​IMG]
     
  3. mrkeys

    mrkeys Occasional commenter

    You should be hiring the band parts.
     
  4. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    Yes, the licensing agreement that will have been signed for your school's production will probably stipulate that the original band parts must be used and that no arrangements or re-orchestrations are allowed. It's also quite common for the licence to stipulate that no cuts are allowed.
     
  5. silverfern

    silverfern New commenter

    The Samuel French website says that:
    Standard rental package includes:
    (Original and School Versions)
    Piano/Conductor’s Score (and optional Electric Piano)
    Reed
    Guitar
    Bass
    Drums
    18 Chorus Books
    And I think that the stage version of the show doesn't include 'You're the One that I Want'?
     
  6. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    Massive facepalm.
     
  7. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    Aside from debate about the morality of this issue, I should like to know if any school ever been prosecuted for this?
    I read anecdotal tales on here along the lines of "I know of a school near me..." or "I once heard about..." etc but I have yet to see some actual evidence in the newspaper or even on the web.

    Link anyone?
     
  8. stupot101

    stupot101 Established commenter

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/copyright-row-puts-skids-under-schools-version-of-grease-1440646.html

    Close enough..... There are others. I do remember a case in the newspapers about 2004 (possibly 2005) Another school n the south of England was prevented from performing Grease because they had not applied for the license.
     
  9. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    Whilst I give you
    credit for snuffling out this story, having read the article I have to
    disagree with the statement "close enough". This was not a case of a
    school being prosecuted for making arangements of pieces from a show. Nor
    is it a case of the school being prosecuted for putting on the show
    without a licence. That is what I was asking about.
    Actually, this was a case where they did have a licence but needed a
    further specific licence to perform the show abroad. This school was
    refused as the rights-holders had already granted a number of licences
    to other organisations at that time.

    Unfortunately you followed this with an annecdote similar to the examples I mentioned in my earlier post:
    In a way, I think that the fact that this was the only story you could find that has even a vague relation to my enquiry reenforces my suspicion that a school has yet to be prosecuted for changing/writing arrangements or band parts, or even for putting on a show without a licence.
    I'm still completely willing to be proved wrong (though annecdotes can't really be taken seriously as proof can they?).

    Link anyone?


    Btw, I do not support infringing the copyright of Grease et al.
     
  10. I would imagine one of the rights holders would be the quickest route for this info, Samuel French, Weinberger, MTI etc. As i'm sure you know, for any production that you put on you have to reserve 2 seats for their representative in case they want to come and see the show (and check that you're doing it as they have stipulated). In all of the shows i've done i've only ever known them to use those seats once! There were no issues as we were, of course, doing what we should have.

    I wonder if they actually employ anyone in a similar way to PRS to pop their heads in on their productions, especially when they have special stipulation. At the moment Grease is basically only available to primary and secondary schools because of the UK tour, even though they're allowed to perform it they are not permitted to advertise anywhere outside of the school. In light of some of the stories I read on here and on the Drama and PA forums it seems it would be worth their while to employ someone to do such a role and to scout the internet for illegal productions if they wanted to raise some extra funds!
     
  11. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    I do know that, yes, thanks :)
    However, my question is about schools that either
    a) don't have a licence or
    b) change the material (cuts, arrangements, band parts etc).

    I await a link.

    Don't you ever go to bed btw?!
     
  12. Insomnia unfortunately, so the sleep can be a little hit and miss!


    The only copyright breach with musicals I ever recall seeing in print was in 'The Stage' newspaper, but that was going back about a decade, I can't find it on line.
     
  13. Just to let you know we DO have a license for Grease but only the conductors score has been ordered. So I now have to order the parts from the company.
    I didn't mean to start a discussion on illegal licenses - but it is interesting all the same that some schools try to save budgets and not get licenses for musicals.
    Thanks for your help though so I didn't end up in hot water! [​IMG]
     
  14. Doitforfree

    Doitforfree Star commenter

  15. Crowbob

    Crowbob Senior commenter

    Why would it necessarily lead to a prosecution? Why would it necessarily lead to a piece in the press?
    Wouldn't it be more likely that the school and the right holder coming to some agreement?
     
  16. florian gassmann

    florian gassmann Star commenter

    There's a two-fold difficulty in potential cases of this sort. No rights holder is going to be willing to press ahead with a civil action against a school because they rewrote a part because they had no cor anglais player. They'd be absolutely terrified of the bad publicity that could so easily follow (Daily Mail: "Money grubbing music publisher bans Hell High's Musical because they can't afford posh musicians").
    On the other hand, allowing any sort of re-arrangement is not going to work either, as publishers are only acting as agents for the work's creators. Lord Andrew Lloyd Webber is perfectly entitled to object to Phantom of the Opera being rearranged as a hip-hop recitation for seven year olds, or a sing-a-long with oom-pah accompaniment for 80 year-old grannies, as both seriously distort his original concept of the work. (Of course, the Puccini family trust have their own argument ...)
     
  17. I have never heard of a school being prosecuted except in the context already discussed of the kind "I heard of" or "A friend told me once, I think". However I do know of several school who have staged Grease from the vocal score, one school I know (where I do not work, by the way) has staged Grease twice, once with the music teacher donig al the arrangements for the instruments that he had at his disposal.
    I think that there is another issue here which is that rights holders of large professional musicals should make their catalogues, or at least part of the their catalogues available to schools for very small flat fees (I would say for free, but that is unlikely). They have already made millions and millions out of these shows and continue to do so - schools, on the other hand are mostly strapped for cash and by allowing musicals to be put on for a token amount rights holders would be contributing to the education of the next generation of audience, next generation of amateur actors who will join theatre societies and put on the show at the commercial rate.
    I think rights holders should take a more forward looking view on this.
    I notice that there are educational versions of some shows around now - Les Mis for example and the rights for these are, I think, more reasonable.
     
  18. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    This is my point. Why then do some posters (not necessarily in this particular thread)appear to delight in warning (almost ordering) other teachers to refrain from altering arrangements and delight in relaying apocryphal scaremongering tales of sackings/shutting down of departments/prosecutions etcetera?
    Some people seem to love that stuff. I wonder why?
     
  19. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    That's just what I'm saying - I don't think it ever has.
     
  20. v12

    v12

    I did write to Music Sales a couple of years ago when I wished to make an arrangement of an old piece of music for which they held the copyright, but which is currently out of print.
    I wanted to arrange as a piano duet 'brilliante' for a fun concert in school - and suggested that if they would like, I could send it to them to consider publishing it at a later date in this form -
    Their reply was swift and unequivocal - any such arrangement needed their approval before it was performed and, if granted, the performance could only take place in front of a non-paying audience within the school. Once.
    And no - they wouldn't be interested in considering an arrangement of it for piano duet - however good it might be!
    Shame. It's a splendid piece of music.
     

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