1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Grandparents as units of time

Discussion in 'History' started by ditwee, Jan 19, 2012.

  1. ditwee

    ditwee New commenter

    I vaguely remember when I was a PGCE student that our History tutor suggested presenting time in terms of grandparents, so the 1st world war for Primary age children is 2 Grandparents ago (their grandparents' grandparents). Can anyone provide me with any details? Thank you for your help.
     
  2. ditwee

    ditwee New commenter

    I vaguely remember when I was a PGCE student that our History tutor suggested presenting time in terms of grandparents, so the 1st world war for Primary age children is 2 Grandparents ago (their grandparents' grandparents). Can anyone provide me with any details? Thank you for your help.
     
  3. lucie19

    lucie19 New commenter

    I've seen this somewhere too but can't remember where. I have a feeling that it may be from Terry Pratchett's Science of the Discworld 2.
    1 grandparent is basically 50 years or there abouts. So WW1 was 2 grandparents (100 years) ago and Henry VIII was 10 grandparents ago. Its very rough but it suprises people that things are so recent when you think in these terms.
     
  4. lucie19

    lucie19 New commenter

    Found it! It is indeed Terry Pratchett. Here is a quote from Jack Cohen one of the co writers
    "A time measurement we developed in The Science of Discworld as a 'human' way of measuring large amounts of time. It's 50 years, a 'typical' age gap between grandparent and grandchild. Most of the really interesting bits of human development have taken place in the last 150 Grandfathers. Remember objects in the rear view mirror are closer than they appear"
    "Most of them being Grandfather bacteria, you appreciate. That's the trouble with metaphors"
     
  5. ditwee

    ditwee New commenter

    Thank you lucie! I do have ALL the Terry Pratchett and co-authored books on my bookshelves so it is probable I just read about it in one of those. I am impressed that you found it. I still think it is a neat idea.
     
  6. lucie19

    lucie19 New commenter

    Yes I'm a big Pratchett fan too.
    I really like the idea of using this in the classroom it's a good way of putting it in a personal way. I'm in my PGCE year and doing storytelling as my dissertation I will be quoting from SOTD2 when they talk about how humans have used storytelling to communicate messages since the dawn of humanity
     

Share This Page