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Grammar support

Discussion in 'Primary' started by Carolyne740, Jul 2, 2012.

  1. Carolyne740

    Carolyne740 New commenter

    Our school is adopting the new curriculum from September - there is a huge focus on grammar. Having read through Grammar for Writing I am a bit worried about my lack of confidence in teaching this as Y6 ... always get confused about the technical terms (adverbial phrases, subordinating clauses etc). Think I understand it and then someone throws in a phrase like "non-finite subordinate clause"!!!
    Differnent types of verbs and adverbs too! Most of all how to teach this to children - and make it fun!!
    Any suggestions as to books/courses etc that I can use to brush up my knowledge? Ta.
     
  2. Carolyne740

    Carolyne740 New commenter

    Our school is adopting the new curriculum from September - there is a huge focus on grammar. Having read through Grammar for Writing I am a bit worried about my lack of confidence in teaching this as Y6 ... always get confused about the technical terms (adverbial phrases, subordinating clauses etc). Think I understand it and then someone throws in a phrase like "non-finite subordinate clause"!!!
    Differnent types of verbs and adverbs too! Most of all how to teach this to children - and make it fun!!
    Any suggestions as to books/courses etc that I can use to brush up my knowledge? Ta.
     
  3. There is only a draft curriculum, not a new curriculum. There could be lots of changes as it doesn't get finalised and in place yet. Do you mean the draft curriculum? It would seem an odd thing to do. Surely they need to wait to see what it ends up like?
     
  4. tafkam

    tafkam Occasional commenter

  5. UP! I have to admit I too feel insecure with subordinate clauses & how to teach them to children! I teach Y2 & know they are referenced in Level 3 writing. Can anyone share what they are clearly & how to teach them ( hangs head in shame!!) I would be particularly interested in thr approach of any Y2 teachers. Try not to be too scathing!![​IMG]
    PS I have bought the above book & am working through it, I find it explains things well & is reassuring to have, I've read the punctuation part & am now on the spelling... grammar after that.
     
  6. A subordinating clause adds extra info to a sentence, but is not the main part.
    eg David, who was 8, wanted a new bike for Christmas.
    'who was 8' is a subordinating clause, and it is also embedded - ie it is within the main clause 'David wanted a new bike for Christmas.'
     
  7. I'd never heard of a subordinate clause before my PGCE. I don't remember coming across any of this technical vocabulary such as 'subordinate clause' or 'adverbial phrase' in my own education. Then again, my retention of information is quite appalling and I've had to revise most things again. I may well pick up that Usborne book just to check for any gaps in my understanding now. Funnily enough, most errors that children make in grammar and punctuation are made by many adults nowadays (comma splice comes to mind).

    @Dalian: I taught SCs in my interview lesson with Y3/4 and I got them to swap around parts of a sentence using cards, and investigating how meaning or emphasis can be changed.
     
  8. languageisheartosay

    languageisheartosay Occasional commenter

    I got an iPad recently and as a touch typist suddenly realised why so
    many messages online seem under-punctuated. Having to change keyboard
    for various items - sometimes twice - is a complete pain. When one was
    at school in the era of Punctuate this: king charles walked and talked half an hour after his head was cut off etc. etc., it really looks odd to see some text nowadays.
    It's having to label things that's difficult - if you can just look at language from the angles of:
    descriptive: we do say that (even if it isn't strictly grammatical)
    prescriptive: we should say that (if we are being very correct but not necessarily lively and lifelike)
    proscriptive: that is not the way to say it and native speakers will consider it wrong
    life becomes much easier!!! (Never use 3 exclamation marks - it is vulgar and unnecessary.) When specialists in linguistics seem to differ in what they call different bits of grammar, it is hard that teachers are suddenly going to be asked to be experts in the field.
    I admire David Warr's work with www.languagegarden.org and he can be booked to demonstrate it or you can see what it's like online.

     
  9. I've just seen a great article on the TES about grammar & it has a really good link to a TES resource of key grammar terms- hurrah- Thanks TES!!

    https://www.tes.co.uk/article.aspx?storyCode=6300174
     
  10. There's a very good book on grammar by David Crystal.
     
  11. Yes I saw that as well. I think a lot of us aren't too confident with grammar purely because we're used to embedding it in context and many of us didn't have rigorous 'training' on grammar as kids ourselves. That said, I think it's all about just knowing the 'jobs' of words in sentences and how different word classes put together ideas in sentences. It's punctuation that gets me usually, especially the semi-colon. If I'm honest, it was only when I started writing job applications that I've really began to use them properly - seems to have had an effect following the job offer!!

    I 'think' there should be a comma before 'while' in your sentence, but to be honest I think the subordinate clause should be at the start of the sentence followed by a comma. This powerpoint is quite good and should help you out: https://www.tes.co.uk/teaching-resource/Subordinate-Clauses-Powerpoint-KS2-6294687/

    It's aimed at KS2 but it should help your knowledge at least.
     
  12. lardylegs

    lardylegs Occasional commenter

    Have a look at The Butterfly Grammar by Irina Tyk. It's meant for children, but might prove very useful form some grown-up teachers......
     
  13. It most definitely doesn't need a comma. You only need commas in the example of 'David, who was nearly 8, etc.. because they enclose the subordinate clause. There is nothing to enclose in your second example.

     
  14. hpblossom

    hpblossom New commenter

    Maizie is right. However, if the subordinate clause comes FIRST, you DO need a comma.
    While I was walking, I could hear the birds.
    Although I like children, I couldn't eat a whole one.
    If you don't like leaving things half-finished, drink the whole bottle of wine.
     
  15. There is a children's version of Eats,shoots and leaves by Lynne Truss. It has cartoons showing the difference punctuation makes and explains the grammar at the end.
     
  16. I am a bit of a self-confessed grammar geek but I think that 'Grammar for Grown ups' by Craig Shrives is very good for self-teaching grammar.

     
  17. Discover Grammar by David Crystal - use it a lot. Use Pie Corbett for ideas to make it more interesting and there are some good ideas and resources on Revisewise and BBC websites designed for Adults learning English that are suitable for older children.
     
  18. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    What is the document "Grammar for Writing" which the OP refers to please?
     

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