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Grade 4 Ofsted!!

Discussion in 'Ofsted inspections' started by GPjayne, Dec 6, 2012.

  1. I have read many of the inadequate lesson posts and today it happened to me.
    The class 26 Year 7's. 10 statements, 7 Action plus all entering secondary school with below level 2 SATS at KS2. 2 Resource based pupils with one to one TA support. That leaves me and 1 more TA for the rest of the class.
    Class arrived over a period of 5 minutes, 3 refused to come in due to a "stranger" being in the room.
    Starter deemed as excellent, but the 4 differentiated resources were too difficult for these pupils and too much teacher assistance. What the hell am supposed to do with 26 pupils who cannot read and write- and the lesson is deemed as inadequate!
    Result- Grade 4 due to the above!!
    Not upset, absolutely furious of the impossible situation i have been put in......
    Anyone else in this situation??


     
  2. I have read many of the inadequate lesson posts and today it happened to me.
    The class 26 Year 7's. 10 statements, 7 Action plus all entering secondary school with below level 2 SATS at KS2. 2 Resource based pupils with one to one TA support. That leaves me and 1 more TA for the rest of the class.
    Class arrived over a period of 5 minutes, 3 refused to come in due to a "stranger" being in the room.
    Starter deemed as excellent, but the 4 differentiated resources were too difficult for these pupils and too much teacher assistance. What the hell am supposed to do with 26 pupils who cannot read and write- and the lesson is deemed as inadequate!
    Result- Grade 4 due to the above!!
    Not upset, absolutely furious of the impossible situation i have been put in......
    Anyone else in this situation??


     
  3. You have been teaching this class since September and are fully aware of their abilities/levels, yet failed to prepare independent activities to meet their needs/abilities/levels.
    So the students are significanly below the expected level - how do you think that primary school teachers manage to teach such students?
    Surely you came into teaching to teach all students? If not then perhaps you need to reconsider the profession of choice or the establishment you choose to work in if you feel incapable of preparing for those below average, such as in a selective school?
    The resulting grade was not, from wht I can see, due to the students levels nor class set up, but YOUR provision for them and possibly lack of evidence that you were starting from their starting points and evidence of progress to date (at this level it may have been small steps, but would be there).

    Just for the record, I have successfully taught whole classes below level 2b and a mix between this and p-scales, with success, so I think that I do know what I m talkign about.
     
  4. You have been teaching this class since September and are fully aware of their abilities/levels, yet failed to prepare independent activities to meet their needs/abilities/levels.

    How would you assume this??? Miss Pious?
    I hope I don't know you ......
     
  5. Unlike other posts I wouldn't dream of passing opinion on your practice. What I would suggest is, given then SEN levels etc, you might think about including/ combining IEP/IEB targets in pupil progress monitoring. Then you get a collective responsibility from SENCOs and SLT to devise support. I don't know about your school but all too often these systems run at best in parallel when they should be combined to maximise best outcomes. Hope this helps.
     
  6. Arrogant and smug
     
  7. I should quantify this arrogant and smug misspious................
     
  8. So we should all pander to the sympsthy calls of an apprently ineffective teacher whom by their own admission cannot understand how to do their job - differentiation is pretty basic - surely evenyou should agree with that.

    If you don't like what I am saying - tough - read the Inspection Framework.

    If you believe that expecting teachers do their best by ALL students is smug and arrogant, so be it.
    Though I feel, sure that if your child was in this teacher's class you want want and expect more for your child than this.
     
  9. thistledoo

    thistledoo Senior commenter

    Dear GPjayne, don't despair. Seek help from your SEND department - ask for a meeting with other staff who also teach these students to share strategies for behaviour and rewards within your class room. Ask your SEND department to help you prepare your lessons and resources - talk to and plan with the TA the content of your lessons. It is a very large class with a large amount of SEN... go get advice and support, make some time or ask for time to go and observe other staff teaching this group... try to build on the work and strategies other staff use - go to your HOD as well. I have been in this situation- several times - and it is hard work... it would be the lesson I spent the most time planning and preparing, for example, resources with illustrations and key words underneath and four or five short tasks within a lesson. Trying to get the students to leave each other alone or work together was a feat in itself - you need a different approach and lots of support. I hope you find this constructive advice and I hope you find the support within your school to help you teach this group successfully.
     
  10. thistledoo

    thistledoo Senior commenter

    Oh and I forgot to say, I am knotting my tongue, Miss Pious, this poster asked for advice, not to be told she is 'apparently ineffective'. You do not know how long this person has been teaching or teaching this group or any details of work load or stress - there isn't a teacher out there that doesn't need help from others, we arrive in school 'qualified' but we all have to gather experience and learn. Including me ... and you.
     
  11. Couldn't agree more with thisledo. There are too many teachers ready to criticize and be smug about their experiences and achievements even when they have only had a few years under their belt. One of the reasons I got out and took early retirement. A good Ofsted lesson IMHO does not necessarily mean you are a good teacher, conversely the opposite is true. My last Ofsted happened last year, I week after I handed in my notice! I had a group of 7 I played the game got a good with outstanding features (whooppee.......). It was an all singing dancing sort of lesson (ICT) very little to do with what i was actually supposed to do but I kind of digressed from the curriculum.
    In 2008 my school was put in special measures, I was seen and I got an inadequate. Not the end of the world......really. I was upset but since then all the times I have been seen (quite a few 6 I believe all satisfactory and good) I have made sure I have played the Ofsted game for that brief period of time so that I am seen doing what they want. I provided masses of data (which no Ofsted nor HMI Inspector even bothered to look at) but as long as I ticked boxes I was ok.
     
  12. Let us just reiterate here - the OP was not asking for support/advice in any form, merely agreement that she should be furious about the 'position' she has been put in:
    What is this situation - a class to teach - where we are expected to do the best by all pupils.
    Had the OP been phrasing her thread in such a way as to ask for advice - I would have proferred all sort of advice - but actually she has worded it in a manner that she wishes other supposed professional to agree that she shouldn't, God Forbid, actually be expected to progress, support and teacher students!
    I am sorry, but I have seen these attitudes too often, blaming the group/school etc, for what, in this case seems apaprent, ARE the teacher's failings - and yes she was ineffective. The key to the future however, is to change her attitude and actually WANT to advance her learners. That is something that we on TES can do nothing to change - that comes from within the teacher.
    As other posters have alluded to, I agree that to be very successful in OFSTED terms there are significant hoops to be jumped through, however, the issues pinpointed by the OP are not what you would call issues relating to hoop jumping but far more basic.

    Let's change the profession: absolutely furious of the impossible situation i have been put in...... woiuld you expect a doctor in an under-resourced, over populated A&E unit to not meet the needs of individual patients, but just hand out paracetamol to all? Of course not, and we would expect this doctor to be monitored/dismissed. So why, should we be told by teachers that this is acceptable for our children?

     
  13. thistledoo

    thistledoo Senior commenter

    I never said it was acceptable, I prefer another approach, an advisory role rather than destroy an individual. Do not assume you know my attitude towards teaching and do not compare the health services and the way in which junior doctors are trained to being in a classroom. The length of time to train to be a doctor, in different medical disciplines/ areas is far longer than training undertaken by teachers. Newly qualified health professionals often stay as 'juniors' for at least five years... the key here is knowing that help and support is needed and going to find it. There are actually, many issues that could be discussed from the original posters situation but we don't know enough about them, therefore to 'launch in' before knowing them all is not wise. Think about it... this poster will not have the class taken away from them because of the Ofsted outcome, so the best course of action is...?
     
  14. I agree that advisory is often best - certainly in the first stages of an 'issue' ebing recognised, however, this being successful relies upon the teacher concerned recognising that they have an issue needing addressing; herin lies the issue with the OP's post - no acceptance of this at all.
    As to comparing the professions, I think it is an appropriate comparison, schools should have support in place for all staff to be successful at all times of their career - this may be a different issue needing to be discussed elsewhere if this is not happening. Certainly this is one of the first things that I established in our workplace.
    And like I said, would any parent wish for their child to be taught by this teacher? No is the obious answer - noone would wish to further disadvantage their own child. And sometimes this bitter pill is the best medicine for a teacher whom is not actually in a place to be able to take the advisory.

     
  15. Joydoron

    Joydoron New commenter

    Sounds like you've had a really tough day, Miss Pious (I'd like to think you're not always like this). You may be good at teaching similar children, but you've shown a few weak areas in your own message. Do you think it's helpful to anybody? How could you improve?
     
  16. Bolter

    Bolter New commenter

    Don't blame the messenger! Miss Pios is simply saying how it is.
    She is not the one delivering 4 lessons. Sure, she lacks a bit of humanity But sometimes the role of the good coach is to be direct and cut the chase
     
  17. Joydoron

    Joydoron New commenter

    Sounds like you've had a really tough day, Miss Pious (I'd like to think you're not always like this). You may be good at teaching similar children, but you've shown a few weak areas in your own message. Do you think it's helpful to anybody? How could you improve?
    As I said, there are weak areas in this message - is it helpful to the OP? How could MissPious improve?
    She is not simply saying it how it is, she is doing it in an inflammatory manner that is unlikely to persuade the OP. Not in the style of a good coach.
     
  18. Give me 3 hours of planning time per lesson and I will happily tailor my resources 34 ways for every individual. Unfortunately, many of us live in the real world.
     
  19. STOP differentiating, this itself lowers expectations and does not raise standards. Its like learning a language the only way to learn is to submerge oneself into the language.
     
  20. To the OP;
    learn from your experience and move on.
    There is nothing else you can do and nothing else you should be thinking about doing.
    Good luck next time they come!
     

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