1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Gove to reform ICT teaching?

Discussion in 'Computing and ICT' started by thescarletimposter, Jan 15, 2012.

  1. Like a stroppy teenager, Mikey Gove put his feet up on the desk and
    declared "Ere this is soooo boring!" as his considered opinion on the
    teaching of ICT in all schools in England and Wales.
    "Technology in schools will no longer be micro-managed by Whitehall.
    By withdrawing the Programme of Study, we're giving teachers freedom
    over what and how to teach, revolutionising ICT as we know it. "
    Quite right. It won't be micro-managed. It will be Micro-soft. Gove is
    proposing that schools should use teaching materials which promote
    Microsoft and Google.
    It is usually the case that when government ministers threaten to
    "reform" something, they are going to reform it the same way the
    iceberg "reformed" the Titanic. In this case the DFE mean they won't
    run ICT on behalf of the corporations, they will let the corporations
    like Microsoft and Google run ICT directly. For Microsoft education is
    a chance to make a fast buck. For Google, everything is a chance to
    acquire information on consumers so they can target advertising at
    them.
    Microsoft Office is available at a special educational price of £99.99
    per unit with additional costs for upgrades. Open source alternatives
    like Open Office are available free.. The upgrades are free too.
    And if Gove seriously wanted pupils to be involved in developing
    software he would be promoting open source software where the code is
    publicly available. This is far more educational than Microsoft which
    protects its code as a "business secret".


     
  2. Like a stroppy teenager, Mikey Gove put his feet up on the desk and
    declared "Ere this is soooo boring!" as his considered opinion on the
    teaching of ICT in all schools in England and Wales.
    "Technology in schools will no longer be micro-managed by Whitehall.
    By withdrawing the Programme of Study, we're giving teachers freedom
    over what and how to teach, revolutionising ICT as we know it. "
    Quite right. It won't be micro-managed. It will be Micro-soft. Gove is
    proposing that schools should use teaching materials which promote
    Microsoft and Google.
    It is usually the case that when government ministers threaten to
    "reform" something, they are going to reform it the same way the
    iceberg "reformed" the Titanic. In this case the DFE mean they won't
    run ICT on behalf of the corporations, they will let the corporations
    like Microsoft and Google run ICT directly. For Microsoft education is
    a chance to make a fast buck. For Google, everything is a chance to
    acquire information on consumers so they can target advertising at
    them.
    Microsoft Office is available at a special educational price of £99.99
    per unit with additional costs for upgrades. Open source alternatives
    like Open Office are available free.. The upgrades are free too.
    And if Gove seriously wanted pupils to be involved in developing
    software he would be promoting open source software where the code is
    publicly available. This is far more educational than Microsoft which
    protects its code as a "business secret".


     
  3. Probably the most feared word in education is "initiative". It used to refer to people having new and original ideas. Now it refers to the latest wheeze from a politician who knows nothing about education and wants to impose a "one size fits all" solution without reference to the needs and interests of children.

    Gove's latest wheeze is to introduce teaching materials backed by Microsoft and Google. If those shysters have the best interests of pupils at heart, I'm the queen of Sheba.
     
  4. Actually it protects it because too many of its developers are awful .....
    I think it is important to teach children to use software, not to use bl**dy Microsoft products. When I started, the equivalent would have been demanding people learn to use Wordstar (CP/M text based Word Processor) and so on. It would be better to use a variety of tools.

     
  5. As an avid linux user, it comes as a shock to hear me say this.
    Microsoft are a force for good in Computing here. Microsoft Principal Researcher Prof. Simon Peyton is advocatin the curriculum here:
    http://www.computingatschool.org.uk/index.php?id=cacfs

    No office software in sight. Simply Computer Science - Algotithms, Programming, Data Structures,Hardware, Communication.
    Get your facts straight.
     
  6. DEmsley

    DEmsley New commenter

    Erm, surely you mean: "No <strike>office</strike> software in sight."?
    Everything that I've ever seen from CAS has been software neutral.

     
  7. First point.

    I'd have to agree. I don't teach ICT but know those that do. Both the teachers and the taught apparently find it utterly soul destroying. One teacher told me it's like "teaching the bleeding obvious". However, as it's considered a soft option (which it is) it's also popular. What are you to do!?


    Nothing wrong there as far as I can see; 'To develop applications for the world's most popular OS or not? Hmmm, tricky".

    Have you checked out DreamSpark - where Microsoft give away its developer tools to students for free?
     
  8. Captain Obvious

    Captain Obvious New commenter

    I suspect that during these cash-strapped times we'll see the rise of a few free to use/Open Source programs. Even MS's Kodu is (currently) free.
    Hmm, but I do remember a lot of destruction during the reformation.
     
  9. Microsoft do have their own best interests at heart, but not to sell software this time. It is to be able to recruit developers. They, and other companies are stuggling at the moment and the situation is getting worse.
     
  10. Captain Obvious

    Captain Obvious New commenter

    The two tend to overlap. MS wants to promote itself, but also wants to ensure it gets the skills into people it might need in the future. If they don't try it, someone else will.
    To imply or assume that corporations are entirely out for themselves is lazy thinking and a simplification of what a business is trying to do.
     
  11. @thescarletimposter
    I feel sorry for any teacher who finds teaching their subject utterly soul destroying, I love my subject and love teaching it. Most of all I like seeing my students enjoy learning it.
    When it comes to year 9 choosing their subjects, I always advise that ICT is NOT the soft option everyone thinks it is and that the work needs to be done, the same as with any other subject.
    If I was "teaching the bleeding obvious", all my kinds would come out with A*'s, so I must be doing something wrong.... either that or whoever said that my by the best damned teacher of ICT there ever was, because their grades must be consistently the best in the country at 100% A - A* (just a thought).
    I don't agree with pushing any company in class, I'm not there to sell products for MS, Apple or anyone else, in the same way that I don't promote any religious or political standpoint.
    Sorry Scarlet, I din't mean it to sound like I'm having a pop at you, I'm just finding this targetting of ICT quite frustrating. I agree it needs an overhaul, but really so extreme?
     

Share This Page